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Say if I am parsing readings from a handheld device of some sort via an input stream. There are readings of different types, and each need parsing differently.

Currently I have a class "handheld" that handles all parsing and creates reading objects of the appropriate type as required. It parses the reading and populates each reading via their "set" methods.

I'm wondering though if the readings themselves should know how to parse the input stream. For instance, when the next reading comes along, should I instantiate the appropriate reading object and call a "parse" method on it, passing it in the input stream?

The main thing I don't like about this is the parsing code is all over the place rather than kept neatly in one place. It does however get rid of the need for all those set methods and the reading can just apply itself to the server/database/whatever when required via the "apply" method I have.

So which would be considered the "nicer" (or more OO) way?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I would go by creating a Factory design pattern.

Create a base class to represent GeneralParser and make a child class for each parser and if there was something common in the parsing method, let it be in the base GeneralParser's Parse method and call base.parse method in child.parse method.

I am sure you have a way to determine which parser to use, and I think currently you're using control statements (if, switch...) and do the parsing. Well now instead of that let the specialized (child) parser class handle it for you.

Pseudo class diagram:

GeneralParser
|
|
->XMLParser
->JsonParser

Here is some implementation in C#.Net

public static class ParserFactory
{
    public static GeneralParser CreateXMLParser()
    {
        return new XMLParser();
    }

    public static GeneralParser CreateJsonParser()
    {
        return new JSONParser();
    }
}

In your program code, you may write something like this (pseudo-code) because it depends on the way that you're deciding which parser to use.

// ...
GeneralParser parser;
if( to_be_parsed_as_xml)
{
    parser = ParserFactory.CreateXMLParser();
    parser.Parse(stream);
}
else if( to_be_parsed_as_json )
{
    parser = ParserFactory.CreateJsonParser();
    parser.Parse(stream);
}
// ...

You can create a parser on the fly (without keeping its reference) if you only need parsers to parse and nothing more.

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