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I have a column of strings (cities) in a csv file. I'd need to go through the list, iterate through all matching patterns, keep only the first one and replace all similar ones with blank lines. I am no programmer, but if I could do this that would help me a lot at work! I have notions of Ruby and notions of regexp in Emacs. Is this feasible? Can anyone help?

Thank you in advance!

File looks like this:

Bordeaux

Bordeaux

Paris

Paris

Paris

Riom

File should look like this:

Bordeaux

(blank)

Paris

(blank)

(blank)

Riom

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Will the names always be grouped together, or could there be others intermingled? –  the Tin Man Nov 26 '10 at 21:26
    
Also, you say you need to do this with multiple columns from a CSV file? Can you show a more complete example of the input if you're dealing with multiple columns? –  the Tin Man Nov 26 '10 at 21:32
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4 Answers 4

Keeping the empty lines:

file_in = File.open('test_villes_ruby.txt','r')
file_out = File.open('test_villes_ruby_stripped.txt','w')

memo = ""
file_in.each do |city|
  if city == memo then
    file_out << "\n"
  else
    file_out << city
    memo = city
  end
end

file_in.close
file_out.close
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Thanks. Actually, it keeps every other line... –  Zazaza Nov 26 '10 at 19:14
    
Oh my... Will rewrite, addding output file. –  steenslag Nov 26 '10 at 19:23
    
Thank you so much. I'd be thrilled to go through my files in a jiffy... (1,500 lines, about 10 columns in different files). Won't feel so much like a lonesome slave anymore! –  Zazaza Nov 26 '10 at 19:29
    
Edited (actually complete rewrite). –  steenslag Nov 26 '10 at 19:32
2  
This is my thank you note: min.us/mbf6W0cWreRgT4 –  Zazaza Nov 26 '10 at 20:02
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For such simple tasks, you can also pass your ruby script directly to the interpreter using -e command line parameter. If you combine it with -n or -p, your ruby script will be performed on every line of the input, in turns. Variable $_ then holds the content of the line currently being processed.

So, if your input file looks like this:

jablan-mbp:dev $ cat test1.txt 
foo
foo
foo
bar
bar
foo
bar
bar
bar
bar
foo

You can execute a simple script this way:

jablan-mbp:dev $ ruby -n -e 'puts(@memo == $_ ? "" : @memo = $_)' < test1.txt 
foo


bar

foo
bar



foo
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Solution:

File.open('cities', 'r') do |f_in|
  File.open('cities_uniq', 'w') do |f_out|
    f_in.inject("") { |o, c| f_out.puts o == c ? "\n" : c ; c}
  end
end

Input:

Bordeaux
Bordeaux
Paris
Paris
Paris
Riom
Riom
Riom
Frankfurt
Wien
Wien

Output:

Bordeaux

Paris


Riom


Frankfurt
Wien

Note: There's an empty line after the final "Wien", but I can't get it to display here...

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Probably the simpliest way is just to use a set (or SortedSet if order matters)

cities = Set.new

cities_in_csv.each do |city|
  cities.add(city)
end

Nothing extra. Sets by definition do not contain duplicate elements.

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OP asked for duplicated elements to be replaced by newlines. –  Michael Kohl Nov 27 '10 at 9:08
    
Thanks for that. I missed that part. It's what I get for answering a question late at night. –  Olives Nov 29 '10 at 23:33
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