Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to use call_user_func to call a method from another method of the same object, e.g.

class MyClass
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->foo('bar');
    }
    public function foo($method)
    {
        return call_user_func(array($this, $method), 'Hello World');
    }

    public function bar($message)
    {
        echo $message;
    }
}

new MyClass; Should return 'Hello World'...

Does anyone know the correct way to achieve this?

Many thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
Looks about right. What doesn't work? –  Pekka 웃 Nov 26 '10 at 19:39
1  
Return has defined meaning in PHP and if you are refering to something else, you should clarify that. –  Gordon Nov 26 '10 at 20:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The code you posted should work just fine. An alternative would be to use "variable functions" like this:

public function foo($method)
{
     //safety first - you might not need this if the $method
     //parameter is tightly controlled....
     if (method_exists($this, $method))
     {
         return $this->$method('Hello World');
     }
     else
     {
         //oh dear - handle this situation in whatever way
         //is appropriate
         return null;
     }
}
share|improve this answer
    
this is also faster than using call_user_func though I've seen many frown upon doing it this way... I am not one of those :-) –  prodigitalson Nov 26 '10 at 19:43
    
this is one of those 'with great power comes great responsibility' idioms...use it for good, not evil :) –  Paul Dixon Nov 26 '10 at 19:45
1  
I would slightly frown upon this because it throws a fatal error if the method doesn't exist, but it's probably safe to assume that check is done elsewhere –  Pekka 웃 Nov 26 '10 at 19:45
1  
@pekka: well for me this is always wrapped in check for method_exists($obj, $method) or is_callable depending on the usage. –  prodigitalson Nov 26 '10 at 19:47
2  
added illustrative code anyway –  Paul Dixon Nov 26 '10 at 19:49

new MyClass; Should return 'Hello World'...

A constructor does not return anything.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think "return" is meant in a very loose sense here (read: he means the echo). Still, you're right –  Pekka 웃 Nov 26 '10 at 19:43
    
@Pekka and whoever agreed with you. If the OP meant return to mean echo, then why is the OP asking the question? The code does echo when the ctor is invoked. –  Gordon Nov 26 '10 at 19:48
    
A constructor doesn't return anything... –  netcoder Nov 26 '10 at 19:48
1  
@Gordon the OP is 1) returning the results of a function that doesn't return anything, and 2) not attempting to return anything in the constructor. To me, that is overwhelming evidence that he didn't really mean "return" :) –  Pekka 웃 Nov 26 '10 at 19:51
    
@gordon: I agreed with Pekka. And while your interpretation is valid formt he point you mention i would say that Pekka's is as well since the OP doesnt even attempt a return $this->foo('bar') in his constructor :-) –  prodigitalson Nov 26 '10 at 19:53

This works for me:

<?php
class MyClass
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->foo('bar');
    }
    public function foo($method)
    {
        return call_user_func(array($this, $method), 'Hello World');
    }

    public function bar($message)
    {
        echo $message;
    }
}

$mc = new MyClass();
?>

This gets printed out:

wraith:Downloads mwilliamson$ php userfunc_test.php 
    Hello World
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I will give it another go, I must of had an error when I originally tried it! –  Fred Nov 26 '10 at 20:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.