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I have written down a program in c and I am trying to create a log file of it.

The problem I am facing is that while printing the outputs of each line in the file I want to write some distinctive feature such as the time of execution of that line or even the line number in the code.

Is there any way I can get to know any of these two.

I don't mind if you suggest some other way to get a distinctive feature. All I want is that looking at the log file the user gets to know that a certain part of the code was getting executed.

Thanks


I am working on linux and thus using the GCC compiler....

I have made a header file and in it I am for testing purposes writing __LINE__ . What I want to do is that in a program when I include this function of header file the line number gets printed where the function is. But instead i get the line number of the header file printf statement.

What do I need to do to get the line number of the file . This is just a test format given below :-

new.h 
       void print()
       {
           printf("Line number is %d",__LINE__);
       }

actual file
       #include "new.h"
       int main()
       {
            print();
       }

Then I want that the line number that should be printed is that of actual file and not new.h which happens now....

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Most C compilers provide some macros to identify each line, function, etc. With GCC, for example, you can use __LINE__, __FUNCTION__, and so on. Check your compiler documentation for details. To get a timestamp, you'll need to let us know what system you're working on.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey can you help a little more.... I have a header file in which I am printing out the line numbers. But the problem I get is that I want to print the line numbers of other file which I am running. How to do this.... – user506710 Nov 26 '10 at 20:24
    
Write a macro for this. eg. #define print() printf("Line number is %d",LINE) – JustSid Nov 26 '10 at 21:52
    
I think that I will have to write this in the actual file but I don't want to that . As in I want that if someone runs my program he gets the values of line number printed and that he does'nt have to include the macro himself.... Thanks a lot... – user506710 Nov 26 '10 at 22:04

If you want the actual date and time the function was executed, try asctime(). There is a good reference on how it's done here.

This will output something akin to Sat May 20 17:36:17 2000. If you want the time in seconds since the program started, have a variable such as int startTime = time() which holds the program start time in seconds from the Unix Epoch. Then, simply print startTime - time() to get the number of seconds since program start.

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Hey ... but I think that for a logging purpose its not useful as my program itself is getting finished in seconds. So there would'nt be any way to tell the difference which code got executed first.... Please correct if wrong :) – user506710 Nov 26 '10 at 19:46
    
If you were using SDL, you could get the time in milliseconds using SDL_GetTicks(), but I doubt you are using it due to the lack of mentioning it. Sorry I can't be of more help! Also, to the other answer-posters, thanks for the __FILE__ and __LINE__ keywords - so helpful! – Bojangles Nov 26 '10 at 19:49
    
Thanks a lot.... – user506710 Nov 26 '10 at 19:57
    
Not a problem! The SO community is always here to help! – Bojangles Nov 26 '10 at 20:10

In GCC you can get line number as "__LINE__". Filename - "__FILE__".

If you want calculate execution time then just remember time on start, get time on end and substract them.

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The line number can be obtained by the preprocessor macro __LINE__. The file is __FILE__. As for time, use the relevant OS library.

Or, use a logging library that support these.

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Use __FILE__ and __LINE__ to get the current file and line number.

Edit: based on your edited question. Here's a simple way to do it to start.

new.h

#define PRINT() print(__LINE__)

void print(int line)
{
    printf("Line number is %d",line);
}

actual file

   #include "new.h"
   int main()
   {
        PRINT();
   }
share|improve this answer
    
Hey can you help a little more.... I have a header file in which I am printing out the line numbers. But the problem I get is that I want to print the line numbers of other file which I am running. How to do this.... – user506710 Nov 26 '10 at 20:50
    
Use #define to make macros that use __LINE__. The __LINE__ will be the line in the .c, not the .h. If you use __LINE__ inside of function in a .h, then it will be the line# in the .h. If I am misunderstanding, post code. – Lou Franco Nov 26 '10 at 21:28
    
Can you tell any implementation way for the edit I have done.... Thanks a lot.... – user506710 Nov 26 '10 at 21:50
    
edited my answer – Lou Franco Nov 27 '10 at 2:45

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