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Can I some how make my non-exception objects become 'throwable' so that any local variables declared in a try block like obj in the try block below

try
{ 
   SomeObject obj = new SomeObject(); 
}catch {}

can cross the scope boundary into the catch{} clause?? I want to use the obj instance in the catch{} clause even if its state is compromised. Is this possible somehow ?

Maybe possible(?) as the C# compiler maybe doing similar (for optimization I'd assume?) and allows the catch clause to receive any System.Object but I can't use that in VS, for this method:

public void Foo()
{

    try
    {
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
    }

    try
    {
    }
    catch
    {
    }

}

generates this IL:

.method public hidebysig instance void  Foo() cil managed
{
  // Code size       22 (0x16)
  .maxstack  1
  .locals init ([0] class [mscorlib]System.Exception ex)
  IL_0000:  nop
  .try
  {
    IL_0001:  nop
    IL_0002:  nop
    IL_0003:  leave.s    IL_000a
  }  // end .try
  catch [mscorlib]System.Exception 
  {
    IL_0005:  stloc.0
    IL_0006:  nop
    IL_0007:  nop
    IL_0008:  leave.s    IL_000a
  }  // end handler
  IL_000a:  nop
  .try
  {
    IL_000b:  nop
    IL_000c:  nop
    IL_000d:  leave.s    IL_0014
  }  // end .try
  catch [mscorlib]System.Object     /* <-- I want to do like this*/
  {
    IL_000f:  pop
    IL_0010:  nop
    IL_0011:  nop
    IL_0012:  leave.s    IL_0014
  }  // end handler
  IL_0014:  nop
  IL_0015:  ret
} // end of method Class::Foo

Is there a way (managed/unmanged) to 'cheat' like that and define a 'throwable' behavior for the SomeObject type so that I can reserve my right to inherit from meaningful classes and not have to inherit from exception classes just make an object 'throwable' ?

How about if I do like this (which is pretty much have I do it currently):

SomeObject obj = null; 
try
{ 
   obj = new SomeObject(); 
}catch {}

is performance slower if obj is defineed inside or outside the try clause as t looks they are both generating identical local to the method (not the try scope) storage variable - you get .locals init ([0] class ClassLibrary.Class obj in the IL either way so maybe its not slower if the variable is never initted ? In other words if I have SomeObject obj = null; defined anywhere inside a method code but I never initialize it to an actual instance of SomeObject, does it matter (performance wise) if my varuable definition is inside the try/catch scope or global to the entire function scope(not inside try/catch) ?

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1  
too much questions o.O –  Seva Nov 26 '10 at 19:58
    
Out of curiosity what were you planning on doing in the catch? –  Conrad Frix Nov 26 '10 at 20:11
    
s So are you encountering a specific exception or is this a general "something bad might happen here and I want to know what's going on" –  Conrad Frix Nov 26 '10 at 20:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

(EDIT: Sorry, I've just seen that you suggested this right at the end of your post. Basically it's the right thing to do!)

No, you can't throw anything that doesn't derive from Exception. But it would be the wrong thing to do anyway - just declare the variable earlier:

SomeObject obj = null;
try
{ 
    obj = new SomeObject(); 
    // Other stuff
}
catch (IOException e) // Or whatever
{
    // Now you can refer to obj
}

Just be aware that obj may be null, if an exception was thrown before the variable was assigned its new value (for example if the SomeObject constructor threw an exception).

No, you won't suffer any performance problems due to this - at least, if there are any effects, they'll be insignificant. The code may end up actually performing an extra assignment, but the chances of that being relevant are practically non-existent.

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2  
Constructors should never throw exceptions, otherwise there is evil code in it, which needs to be removed. –  Danny Chen Nov 26 '10 at 20:06
    
@ivo s: Well, look at your original code (one assignment) and the final code (two - one of null, the other not). It's possible that the JIT can optimize that out, but I don't know for sure. –  Jon Skeet Nov 26 '10 at 20:19
5  
@Danny: I disagree completely. It's entirely reasonable for constructors to throw exceptions in C#, and many standard library classes do. What do you want new List<int>(-10) to do? It's a bad thing if a constructor throws an exception having acquired a resource, and in that case it should definitely dispose of it appropriately... but that's a special case. –  Jon Skeet Nov 26 '10 at 20:20
2  
@Danny Chen: A constructor not being able to construct a new instance of the desired object is an exceptional situation. How else do you propose that failure-to-construct be signaled? –  Jason Nov 26 '10 at 20:25
    
@Downvoter: Care to explain what's wrong with my answer? –  Jon Skeet Nov 26 '10 at 20:26

A previous answer has already recommended moving the declaration of SomeObject obj to before the try block. If you need to access obj higher in the call stack, you can create a subclass of Exception that contains a property of type SomeObject, which you can use to pass obj around:

class SomeObjectException : Exception
{
  // Constructors here
  public SomeObject Object { get; set; }
}

and

throw new SomeObjectException { Object = obj }; 
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1  
It's not a good idea to use Object as a member name, even if it can be compiled. –  Danny Chen Nov 26 '10 at 20:09
    
Just noting that you still need to define obj outside of the try{} scope to use this method –  Michael Paulukonis Nov 26 '10 at 20:10
1  
Good insight, however, you'll probably want to encapsulate the exception class more tightly by getting rid of the set and moving initialization to the constructor. –  codekaizen Nov 26 '10 at 20:11

Do you really have to worry about that kind of performance issues? The bottle neck will not be your try/catch or variable declaration/initializations.

SomeObject obj = null; 
try
{ 
   obj = new SomeObject(); 
}
catch (SpecificException err)
{
   //use obj here.
}

Is the way to do it

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I don't know any other way to bahave like Exception by inhrit from Exception. I don't understand why do you need to change it. Yes, I guess if you put the try, the operations will lazy more.

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First, no, there is no way to define a variable inside a block and access it outside of the block. It doesn't matter if it is a try block, a catch block or something else. Blocks define the scope of a variable, and variables defined inside the block are scoped to that level. And when something goes out of scope, it becomes eligible for garbage collection (assuming ref counts are 0, etc, etc).

If you need to access the variable outside of the block, what you did at the end is absolutely correct. If you are using try/catch, you have way more performance problems to worry about than the variable declaration happening outside (since a catch involves walking the frames to find a handler, etc, etc).

What you /could/ do is throw your own custom exception with the object in the data. I wouldn't recommend doing that, since it isn't clear to me what you want to do. If you just want to clean it up, then just declare it outside. Or, if you aren't going to do anything with the exception, for heavens sake use the using declaration. Yes, your object needs to implement IDisposable, but if you have clean up code to do there, technically you may as well be.

One last thing. You said:

I want to use the obj instance in the catch{} clause even if its state is compromised.

Note there are instances when state can be compromised and there isn't a darn thing you can do about it. StackOverflow, ExecutionEngineException and OutOfMemoryException all come to mind. Also, when you are using multithreaded code, all bets are off if you aren't locking properly.

For a quick intro into things like memory management, exception handling, etc, you can take a look at this presentation I did on Debugging .NET with WinDBG and SOS.

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