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How could I do this...? Do you have any ideas? Thank you.

for ( /* ... */ ) {

  someFunction(param1, praram2, function(result) {

    // Okay, for cycle could continue

  })

}

alert("For cycle ended");
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19  
Wow ( /* ... */ ) looks like a monster and I'm scared now :( –  Pointy Nov 26 '10 at 22:29
2  
I think we need more details. Do you need your loop to wait for an async call before continuing? –  Adam Lassek Nov 26 '10 at 22:37
    
@Adam Yes, yes, yes! –  Marry Hoffser Nov 26 '10 at 22:38
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8 Answers

up vote 66 down vote accepted

You can't mix synchronous and asynchronous in JavaScript if you block the script, you block the Browser.

You need to go the full event driven way here, luckily we can hide the ugly stuff away.

EDIT: Updated the code.

function asyncLoop(iterations, func, callback) {
    var index = 0;
    var done = false;
    var loop = {
        next: function() {
            if (done) {
                return;
            }

            if (index < iterations) {
                index++;
                func(loop);

            } else {
                done = true;
                callback();
            }
        },

        iteration: function() {
            return index - 1;
        },

        break: function() {
            done = true;
            callback();
        }
    };
    loop.next();
    return loop;
}

This will provide us an asynchronous loop, you can of course modify it even further to take for example a function to check the loop condition etc.

Now on to the test:

function someFunction(a, b, callback) {
    console.log('Hey doing some stuff!');
    callback();
}

asyncLoop(10, function(loop) {
    someFunction(1, 2, function(result) {

        // log the iteration
        console.log(loop.iteration());

        // Okay, for cycle could continue
        loop.next();
    })},
    function(){console.log('cycle ended')}
);

And the output:

Hey doing some stuff!
0
Hey doing some stuff!
1
Hey doing some stuff!
2
Hey doing some stuff!
3
Hey doing some stuff!
4
Hey doing some stuff!
5
Hey doing some stuff!
6
Hey doing some stuff!
7
Hey doing some stuff!
8
Hey doing some stuff!
9
cycle ended
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, thank you so much! –  Marry Hoffser Nov 26 '10 at 22:45
3  
It's a crime that this answer doesn't even have one upvote. +1 –  meder Nov 26 '10 at 23:13
    
Awesome. What a hero :P –  Dominic Bartl Jan 22 '13 at 11:25
6  
maybe I am missing something, but I don't understand how this is actually asyncronous. Don't you need a setTimeout or something? I tried your code, took out the console.log, and turned up the count a lot and it just freezes the browser. –  rocketsarefast Mar 29 '13 at 20:14
    
I'm confused as to what loop.break() is meant to be doing? Just a way to force out if you want to? –  Zackehh9lives Jan 2 at 3:18
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I simplified this:

FUNCTION:

var asyncLoop = function(o){
    var i=-1;

    var loop = function(){
        i++;
        if(i==o.length){o.callback(); return;}
        o.functionToLoop(loop, i);
    } 
    loop();//init
}

USAGE:

asyncLoop({
    length : 5,
    functionToLoop : function(loop, i){
        setTimeout(function(){
            document.write('Iteration ' + i + ' <br>');
            loop();
        },1000);
    },
    callback : function(){
        document.write('All done!');
    }    
});

EXAMPLE: http://jsfiddle.net/NXTv7/8/

share|improve this answer
    
Incredible. Thank you. –  Scott David Tesler Nov 16 '12 at 9:44
    
+1 I did something similar to this, but i put the setTimeout part in the library function. –  rocketsarefast Mar 29 '13 at 20:16
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A cleaner alternative to what @Ivo has suggested would be an Asynchronous Method Queue, assuming that you only need to make one async call for the collection.

(See this post by Dustin Diaz for a more detailed explanation)

function Queue() {
  this._methods = [];
  this._response = null;
  this._flushed = false;
}

(function(Q){

  Q.add = function (fn) {
    if (this._flushed) fn(this._response);
    else this._methods.push(fn);
  }

  Q.flush = function (response) {
    if (this._flushed) return;
    this._response = response;
    while (this._methods[0]) {
      this._methods.shift()(response);
    }
    this._flushed = true;
  }

})(Queue.prototype);

You simply create a new instance of Queue, add the callbacks you need, and then flush the queue with the async response.

var queue = new Queue();

queue.add(function(results){
  for (var result in results) {
    // normal loop operation here
  }
});

someFunction(param1, param2, function(results) {
  queue.flush(results);
}

An added benefit of this pattern is that you can add multiple functions to the queue instead of just one.

If you have an object which contains iterator functions, you can add support for this queue behind the scenes and write code which looks synchronous, but isn't:

MyClass.each(function(result){ ... })

simply write each to put the anonymous function into the queue instead of executing it immediately, and then flush the queue when your async call is complete. This is a very simple and powerful design pattern.

P.S. If you're using jQuery, you already have an async method queue at your disposal called jQuery.Deferred.

share|improve this answer
    
Well if understood the question correctly this will not yield the desired behavior, it seems that she wants to do some callbacks in someFunction which delay the rest of the loop, your pattern sets up a list of functions which will get executed in order and will all receive the results of one other function call. It's a good pattern but I don't think it matches the question in question. –  Ivo Wetzel Nov 26 '10 at 23:54
    
@Ivo Without more information we won't know for sure, but speaking in generalities I think it is bad design to make synchronous code wait for an async operation before continuing; in every case I have tried it, it resulted in a noticeable UI lag due to JS being single-threaded. If the operation takes too long, you run the risk of your script being forcibly stopped by the browser. –  Adam Lassek Nov 27 '10 at 0:02
    
@Ivo also I am very wary of code that relies on setTimeout. You risk unintended behavior if the code is executed faster than you anticipate. –  Adam Lassek Nov 27 '10 at 0:11
    
@Adam In which way would I risk unintended behavior with setTimeout what if the callback takes only half the time, well the code executes faster again... so what's the point? The "code" in the "loop" is still in order, if you do some stuff outside of it before the complete callback you're already calling for trouble, but then again it's single threaded, I have a hard time coming up with a scenario where setTimeout would break something, without further mis-design. –  Ivo Wetzel Nov 27 '10 at 0:17
    
Also, he asked for a Node.js module like this in another question, I stated there that's it in general a bad idea to have a generic solution for such "async-sync" loops. I'd rather go with something that matches the exact requirements of whatever I'm trying to achieve. –  Ivo Wetzel Nov 27 '10 at 0:18
show 5 more comments

We can also use help of jquery.Deferred. in this case asyncLoop function would look like this:

asyncLoop = function(array, callback) {
  var nextElement, thisIteration;
  if (array.length > 0) nextElement = array.pop();
  thisIteration = callback(nextElement);
  $.when(thisIteration).done(function(response) {
    // here we can check value of response in order to break or whatever
    if (array.length > 0) asyncLoop(array, collection, callback);
  });
};

the callback function will look like this:

addEntry = function(newEntry) {
  var deferred, duplicateEntry;
  // on the next line we can perform some check, which may cause async response.
  duplicateEntry = someCheckHere();
  if (duplicateEntry === true) {
    deferred = $.Deferred();
    // here we launch some other function (e.g. $.ajax or popup window) 
    // which based on result must call deferred.resolve([opt args - response])
    // when deferred.resolve is called "asyncLoop" will start new iteration
    // example function:
    exampleFunction(duplicateEntry, deferred);
    return deferred;
  } else {
    return someActionIfNotDuplicate();
  }
};

example function that resolves deferred:

function exampleFunction(entry, deffered){
  openModal({
    title: "what should we do with duplicate"
    options: [
       {name:"Replace", action: function(){replace(entry);deffered.resolve(replace:true)}},
       {name: "Keep Existing", action: function(){deffered.resolve(replace:false)}}
    ]
  })
}
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I have been using the "setTimeout(Func,0);" trick for about year. Here is some recent research i wrote up to explain how to speed it up a bit. If you just want the answer, skip to Step 4. Step 1 2 and 3 explain the reasoning and mechanics;

// In Depth Analysis of the setTimeout(Func,0) trick.

//////// setTimeout(Func,0) Step 1 ////////////
// setTimeout and setInterval impose a minimum 
// time limit of about 2 to 10 milliseconds.

  console.log("start");
  var workCounter=0;
  var WorkHard = function()
  {
    if(workCounter>=2000) {console.log("done"); return;}
    workCounter++;
    setTimeout(WorkHard,0);
  };

// this take about 9 seconds
// that works out to be about 4.5ms per iteration
// Now there is a subtle rule here that you can tweak
// This minimum is counted from the time the setTimeout was executed.
// THEREFORE:

  console.log("start");
  var workCounter=0;
  var WorkHard = function()
  {
    if(workCounter>=2000) {console.log("done"); return;}
    setTimeout(WorkHard,0);
    workCounter++;
  };

// This code is slightly faster because we register the setTimeout
// a line of code earlier. Actually, the speed difference is immesurable 
// in this case, but the concept is true. Step 2 shows a measurable example.
///////////////////////////////////////////////


//////// setTimeout(Func,0) Step 2 ////////////
// Here is a measurable example of the concept covered in Step 1.

  var StartWork = function()
  {
    console.log("start");
    var startTime = new Date();
    var workCounter=0;
    var sum=0;
    var WorkHard = function()
    {
      if(workCounter>=2000) 
      {
        var ms = (new Date()).getTime() - startTime.getTime();
        console.log("done: sum=" + sum + " time=" + ms + "ms"); 
        return;
      }
      for(var i=0; i<1500000; i++) {sum++;}
      workCounter++;
      setTimeout(WorkHard,0);
    };
    WorkHard();
  };

// This adds some difficulty to the work instead of just incrementing a number
// This prints "done: sum=3000000000 time=18809ms".
// So it took 18.8 seconds.

  var StartWork = function()
  {
    console.log("start");
    var startTime = new Date();
    var workCounter=0;
    var sum=0;
    var WorkHard = function()
    {
      if(workCounter>=2000) 
      {
        var ms = (new Date()).getTime() - startTime.getTime();
        console.log("done: sum=" + sum + " time=" + ms + "ms"); 
        return;
      }
      setTimeout(WorkHard,0);
      for(var i=0; i<1500000; i++) {sum++;}
      workCounter++;
    };
    WorkHard();
  };

// Now, as we planned, we move the setTimeout to before the difficult part
// This prints: "done: sum=3000000000 time=12680ms"
// So it took 12.6 seconds. With a little math, (18.8-12.6)/2000 = 3.1ms
// We have effectively shaved off 3.1ms of the original 4.5ms of dead time.
// Assuming some of that time may be attributed to function calls and variable 
// instantiations, we have eliminated the wait time imposed by setTimeout.

// LESSON LEARNED: If you want to use the setTimeout(Func,0) trick with high 
// performance in mind, make sure your function takes more than 4.5ms, and set 
// the next timeout at the start of your function, instead of the end.
///////////////////////////////////////////////


//////// setTimeout(Func,0) Step 3 ////////////
// The results of Step 2 are very educational, but it doesn't really tell us how to apply the
// concept to the real world.  Step 2 says "make sure your function takes more than 4.5ms".
// No one makes functions that take 4.5ms. Functions either take a few microseconds, 
// or several seconds, or several minutes. This magic 4.5ms is unattainable.

// To solve the problem, we introduce the concept of "Burn Time".
// Lets assume that you can break up your difficult function into pieces that take 
// a few milliseconds or less to complete. Then the concept of Burn Time says, 
// "crunch several of the individual pieces until we reach 4.5ms, then exit"

// Step 1 shows a function that is asyncronous, but takes 9 seconds to run. In reality
// we could have easilly incremented workCounter 2000 times in under a millisecond.
// So, duh, that should not be made asyncronous, its horrible. But what if you don't know
// how many times you need to increment the number, maybe you need to run the loop 20 times,
// maybe you need to run the loop 2 billion times.

  console.log("start");
  var startTime = new Date();
  var workCounter=0;
  for(var i=0; i<2000000000; i++) // 2 billion
  {
    workCounter++;
  }
  var ms = (new Date()).getTime() - startTime.getTime();
  console.log("done: workCounter=" + workCounter + " time=" + ms + "ms"); 

// prints: "done: workCounter=2000000000 time=7214ms"
// So it took 7.2 seconds. Can we break this up into smaller pieces? Yes.
// I know, this is a retarded example, bear with me.

  console.log("start");
  var startTime = new Date();
  var workCounter=0;
  var each = function()
  {
    workCounter++;
  };
  for(var i=0; i<20000000; i++) // 20 million
  {
    each();
  }
  var ms = (new Date()).getTime() - startTime.getTime();
  console.log("done: workCounter=" + workCounter + " time=" + ms + "ms"); 

// The easiest way is to break it up into 2 billion smaller pieces, each of which take 
// only several picoseconds to run. Ok, actually, I am reducing the number from 2 billion
// to 20 million (100x less).  Just adding a function call increases the complexity of the loop
// 100 fold. Good lesson for some other topic.
// prints: "done: workCounter=20000000 time=7648ms"
// So it took 7.6 seconds, thats a good starting point.
// Now, lets sprinkle in the async part with the burn concept

  console.log("start");
  var startTime = new Date();
  var workCounter=0;
  var index=0;
  var end = 20000000;
  var each = function()
  {
    workCounter++;
  };
  var Work = function()
  {
    var burnTimeout = new Date();
    burnTimeout.setTime(burnTimeout.getTime() + 4.5); // burnTimeout set to 4.5ms in the future
    while((new Date()) < burnTimeout)
    {
      if(index>=end) 
      {
        var ms = (new Date()).getTime() - startTime.getTime();
        console.log("done: workCounter=" + workCounter + " time=" + ms + "ms"); 
        return;
      }
      each();
      index++;
    }
    setTimeout(Work,0);
  };

// prints "done: workCounter=20000000 time=107119ms"
// Sweet Jesus, I increased my 7.6 second function to 107.1 seconds.
// But it does prevent the browser from locking up, So i guess thats a plus.
// Again, the actual objective here is just to increment workCounter, so the overhead of all
// the async garbage is huge in comparison. 
// Anyway, Lets start by taking advice from Step 2 and move the setTimeout above the hard part. 

  console.log("start");
  var startTime = new Date();
  var workCounter=0;
  var index=0;
  var end = 20000000;
  var each = function()
  {
    workCounter++;
  };
  var Work = function()
  {
    if(index>=end) {return;}
    setTimeout(Work,0);
    var burnTimeout = new Date();
    burnTimeout.setTime(burnTimeout.getTime() + 4.5); // burnTimeout set to 4.5ms in the future
    while((new Date()) < burnTimeout)
    {
      if(index>=end) 
      {
        var ms = (new Date()).getTime() - startTime.getTime();
        console.log("done: workCounter=" + workCounter + " time=" + ms + "ms"); 
        return;
      }
      each();
      index++;
    }
  };

// This means we also have to check index right away because the last iteration will have nothing to do
// prints "done: workCounter=20000000 time=52892ms"  
// So, it took 52.8 seconds. Improvement, but way slower than the native 7.6 seconds.
// The Burn Time is the number you tweak to get a nice balance between native loop speed
// and browser responsiveness. Lets change it from 4.5ms to 50ms, because we don't really need faster
// than 50ms gui response.

  console.log("start");
  var startTime = new Date();
  var workCounter=0;
  var index=0;
  var end = 20000000;
  var each = function()
  {
    workCounter++;
  };
  var Work = function()
  {
    if(index>=end) {return;}
    setTimeout(Work,0);
    var burnTimeout = new Date();
    burnTimeout.setTime(burnTimeout.getTime() + 50); // burnTimeout set to 50ms in the future
    while((new Date()) < burnTimeout)
    {
      if(index>=end) 
      {
        var ms = (new Date()).getTime() - startTime.getTime();
        console.log("done: workCounter=" + workCounter + " time=" + ms + "ms"); 
        return;
      }
      each();
      index++;
    }
  };

// prints "done: workCounter=20000000 time=52272ms"
// So it took 52.2 seconds. No real improvement here which proves that the imposed limits of setTimeout
// have been eliminated as long as the burn time is anything over 4.5ms
///////////////////////////////////////////////


//////// setTimeout(Func,0) Step 4 ////////////
// The performance numbers from Step 3 seem pretty grim, but GUI responsiveness is often worth it.
// Here is a short library that embodies these concepts and gives a descent interface.

  var WilkesAsyncBurn = function()
  {
    var Now = function() {return (new Date());};
    var CreateFutureDate = function(milliseconds)
    {
      var t = Now();
      t.setTime(t.getTime() + milliseconds);
      return t;
    };
    var For = function(start, end, eachCallback, finalCallback, msBurnTime)
    {
      var i = start;
      var Each = function()
      {
        if(i==-1) {return;} //always does one last each with nothing to do
        setTimeout(Each,0);
        var burnTimeout = CreateFutureDate(msBurnTime);
        while(Now() < burnTimeout)
        {
          if(i>=end) {i=-1; finalCallback(); return;}
          eachCallback(i);
          i++;
        }
      };
      Each();
    };
    var ForEach = function(array, eachCallback, finalCallback, msBurnTime)
    {
      var i = 0;
      var len = array.length;
      var Each = function()
      {
        if(i==-1) {return;}
        setTimeout(Each,0);
        var burnTimeout = CreateFutureDate(msBurnTime);
        while(Now() < burnTimeout)
        {
          if(i>=len) {i=-1; finalCallback(array); return;}
          eachCallback(i, array[i]);
          i++;
        }
      };
      Each();
    };

    var pub = {};
    pub.For = For;          //eachCallback(index); finalCallback();
    pub.ForEach = ForEach;  //eachCallback(index,value); finalCallback(array);
    WilkesAsyncBurn = pub;
  };

///////////////////////////////////////////////


//////// setTimeout(Func,0) Step 5 ////////////
// Here is an examples of how to use the library from Step 4.

  WilkesAsyncBurn(); // Init the library
  console.log("start");
  var startTime = new Date();
  var workCounter=0;
  var FuncEach = function()
  {
    if(workCounter%1000==0)
    {
      var s = "<div></div>";
      var div = jQuery("*[class~=r1]");
      div.append(s);
    }
    workCounter++;
  };
  var FuncFinal = function()
  {
    var ms = (new Date()).getTime() - startTime.getTime();
    console.log("done: workCounter=" + workCounter + " time=" + ms + "ms"); 
  };
  WilkesAsyncBurn.For(0,2000000,FuncEach,FuncFinal,50);

// prints: "done: workCounter=20000000 time=149303ms"
// Also appends a few thousand divs to the html page, about 20 at a time.
// The browser is responsive the entire time, mission accomplished

// LESSON LEARNED: If your code pieces are super tiny, like incrementing a number, or walking through 
// an array summing the numbers, then just putting it in an "each" function is going to kill you. 
// You can still use the concept here, but your "each" function should also have a for loop in it 
// where you burn a few hundred items manually.  
///////////////////////////////////////////////
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Given an asynchronous worker function someFunction that will call back a result function with a result argument saying whether or not the loop should continue:

// having:
// function someFunction(param1, praram2, resultfunc))
// function done() { alert("For cycle ended"); }

(function(f){ f(f) })(function(f){
  someFunction("param1", "praram2", function(result){
    if (result)
      f(f); // loop continues
    else
      done(); // loop ends
  });
})

In order to check whether or not to end the loop, the worker function someFunction can forward the result function to other asynchronous operations. Also, the whole expression can be encapsulated into an asynchronous function by taking a function done as callback.

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Also look at this splendid library caolan / async. Your for loop can easily be accomplished using mapSeries or series.

I could post some sample code if your example had more details in it.

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http://cuzztuts.blogspot.ro/2011/12/js-async-for-very-cool.html

EDIT:

link from github: https://github.com/cuzzea/lib_repo/blob/master/cuzzea/js/functions/core/async_for.js

function async_for_each(object,settings){
var l=object.length;
    settings.limit = settings.limit || Math.round(l/100);
    settings.start = settings.start || 0;
    settings.timeout = settings.timeout || 1;
    for(var i=settings.start;i<l;i++){
        if(i-settings.start>=settings.limit){
            setTimeout(function(){
                settings.start = i;
                async_for_each(object,settings)
            },settings.timeout);
            settings.limit_callback ? settings.limit_callback(i,l) : null;
            return false;
        }else{
            settings.cbk ? settings.cbk(i,object[i]) : null;
        }
    }
    settings.end_cbk?settings.end_cbk():null;
    return true;
}

This function allows you to to create a percent break in the for loop using settings.limit. The limit property is just a integer, but when set as array.length * 0.1, this will make the settings.limit_callback to be called every 10%.

/*
 * params:
 *  object:         the array to parse
 *  settings_object:
 *      cbk:            function to call whenwhen object is found in array
 *                          params: i,object[i]
 *      limit_calback:  function to call when limit is reached
 *                          params: i, object_length
 *      end_cbk:        function to call when loop is finished
 *                          params: none
 *      limit:          number of iteration before breacking the for loop
 *                          default: object.length/100
 *      timeout:        time until start of the for loop(ms)
 *                          default: 1
 *      start:          the index from where to start the for loop
 *                          default: 0
 */

exemple:

var a = [];
a.length = 1000;
async_for_each(a,{
    limit_callback:function(i,l){console.log("loading %s/%s - %s%",i,l,Math.round(i*100/l))}
});
share|improve this answer
    
Do you think you could summarize the article here in case the link breaks in the future? meta.stackexchange.com/questions/8231/… –  GSee Jul 22 '12 at 2:26
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