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I have two classes in a class hierarchy where a parent class needs to have an instance of a class derived from it as a member variable. As an example:

class B;

class A {
public:
    B* binst;

    A();
};

class B : public A {
};

A::A() {
    binst = new B;
}

Obviously, this causes an infinite recursion in the constructors, because to create a new B you have to call A's constructor, which creates a new B which calls A's constructor, and so ad infinitum.

Is there a way around this? The problem I'm having in this is that A has to have a B in it, but B must be derived from A, and there's not a way to prevent that.

To get an idea of why I need to do this, consider an object oriented hierarchy for a scripting language (like python or ruby or lua, etc):

  1. All instances of anything are derived from a base class, Object.
  2. Object has a method lookup table, which is an instance of MethodTable.
  3. MethodTable is derived from Object, and must be, for the scripting language to be able to operate on it.
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I suppose that all MethodTables have lookup to one single MethodTable, which has lookup to itself, so there's no recursion. There is no new B from constructor in that example. We need your actual case to figure out what to do with new B. –  Dialecticus Nov 26 '10 at 23:33

8 Answers 8

  • "Object has a method lookup table"
  • "MethodTable is derived from Object"

Putting aside coding concerns, do these statements really make sense together from even a conceptual standpoint? Should a MethodTable have its own MethodTable which then has its own MethodTable... etc?

I'd say it sounds like you need to refactor your concepts a bit. For instance, perhaps Object itself should somehow be responsible for exposing the necessary pieces of its MethodTable member. Thus not requiring MethodTable itself to be an Object. (There may be various other feasible designs too. It's hard to say without deeper knowledge of the actual project.)

share|improve this answer
    
well actually ,it can. Once upon a time I developped in Clipper with a third-party library for creating user defined classes. In there the class 'class' which was a superclass of every other class ,was implemented as an object. Since every object always has a class to which it belong to ,there was the above recursion. –  Edwin Nov 27 '10 at 1:38

Edit: Typically, compiler/implementation-internal types don't derive from language-dependent types. If you look at the internals of Java, their inheritance implementation won't derive from Object. Object is a language construction, it's part of your language's interface. A method table is part of the implementation. A method table should not be operated on by the language, it should be operated on by the implementation.

Moreover, enforced deriving from Object is a stupid thing to do and it happens because you didn't consider the language design and how the users were going to write generic code properly. This is especially true in dynamically typed languages like Lua or Python.

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Object could have a private MethodTableImpl member and a public getter that returns a MethodTable. MethodTable contains a MethodTableImpl and derives from Object.

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I don't know the purpose of your classes but here is a suggestion :

class A
{
public:
    virtual void func DoIt () = 0;
    ...
};

class B : public virtual A
{
public:
};

class C : public virtual A ,B
{
    void func DoIt () { /* statements */ }
};

now there is only 1 instance of class A.

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It would be helpful to understand exactly are you trying to achieve via this construct.

As you've noted yourself, this is effectively like having A's constructor construct an instance of A, and that's an unavoidable path to stack overflow.

A more general solution would be to provide a set_subclass method for a pointer to an instance of A, which could then be populated by any subclass of A, not just B.

class A {
public:
    A();
    virtual ~A();

    set_subclass(A* sub) { subclass = sub; }
private:
    A* subclass;
};
share|improve this answer
// List(1) or Stream(2) using inheritance
struct B;

struct A { 
  B *inst; 
  A(B *inst_) : inst(inst_) {}
  A()  : inst(0) {}
};

struct B : A {
  B(B *_inst) : A(inst) {}
  // chose option 1 or 2
  B() : A() {}       // option 1: List
  B() : A(0) {}      // same as above
  B() : A(this) {}   // option 2: Stream
};

auto B3 = new B(new B( new B));
// This is either a length 3 list (1)
// or a stream (2) implemented by self ref 3rd element
share|improve this answer
    
Did you think of this yourself ,or did you read my answer first ? –  Edwin Nov 27 '10 at 1:50
    
@Edwin: i don't remember, I agree it basically elaborates your answer with actual code. –  Yttrill Dec 4 '10 at 22:55

You can make a constructor for class A which accepts a pointer to an object to class B and assign this pointer instead of allocating a new B:

A::A(B* b) : binst (b) {}

And in the construct of class B you pass 'this' in constructor of A:

B::B() : A(this) {} 

The compiler will probably complain about it, but you can try. (It is ugly, though.)

Note that you can NOT use the binst pointer to access object B in A's constructor, because it's not fully constructed yet.

share|improve this answer
    
in the above ,i meant you cannot use the Object B (only the pointer) in A's constructor. –  Edwin Nov 27 '10 at 0:20

Does it actually need the binst as a member, or does it simply need to access it?

class B;

class A {
public:
    B& binst(); //throws exception if not derived from B

    A() {}
    virtual ~A() {} //effectively required for the dynamic_cast
    void foo();
};

class B : public A {
public:
    void bar() {};
};

B& A::binst() {return dynamic_cast<B&>(this);} 
void A::foo() {return binst().bar();}
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