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I'd like to implent the System.ComponentModel.INotifyPropertyChanged interface for a property on a base class, but I'm not quite sure how to hook it up.

Here's the signature for the property I'd like to get notifications for:

public abstract bool HasChanged();

And my code in the base class for handling the change:

public event System.ComponentModel.PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

private void OnPropertyChanged(String info)
{
    PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
    if (handler != null)
    {
        handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(info));
    }
}

How do I handle the hookup of the event in the base class without having to call OnPropertyChanged() in each child class?

Thanks,
Sonny

EDIT: OK... so I think that when the value for HasChanged() changes, I'm supposed to call OnPropertyChanged("HasChanged"), but I'm not sure how to get that into the base class. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Generally speaking, this is not possible. –  Jon Nov 27 '10 at 0:50
    
Also, HasChanged is a method here, not a property. Copy/paste error? –  Jon Nov 27 '10 at 0:52
    
not true, he can still update the base class's property, see my edited answer below. –  VoodooChild Nov 27 '10 at 1:16
    
@Sonny Boy: The HasChanged() is an abstract method in your question, and you canNot do what you are after because an abstract method provides no actual implementation. –  VoodooChild Nov 27 '10 at 2:37
    
Is the base class in a different assembly? –  Simon Nov 30 '10 at 0:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is this what you are after?

public abstract class ViewModelBase : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    //make it protected, so it is accessible from Child classes
    protected void OnPropertyChanged(String info)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(info));
        }
    }

}

Notice the OnPropertyChanged accessible level is protected. And then in your concrete class or child classes, you do:

public class PersonViewModel : ViewModelBase
{

    public PersonViewModel(Person person)
    {
        this.person = person;
    }

    public string Name
    {
        get
        {
            return this.person.Name;
        }
        set
        {
            this.person.Name = value;
            OnPropertyChanged("Name");
        }
    }
}

EDIT: after reading the OP question again, I realize that he does not want to call the OnPropertyChanged in the child class, so I am pretty sure this will work:

public abstract class ViewModelBase : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    private bool hasChanged = false;
    public bool HasChanged
    {
        get
        {
            return this.hasChanged;
        }
        set
        {
            this.hasChanged = value;
            OnPropertyChanged("HasChanged");
        }
    }

    //make it protected, so it is accessible from Child classes
    protected void OnPropertyChanged(String info)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(info));
        }
    }
}

and in child class:

public class PersonViewModel : ViewModelBase
{
    public PersonViewModel()
    {
        base.HasChanged = true;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
you really should check for equality of value and backing field before setting and raising the changed event if ( value != this.person.name) –  Muad'Dib Nov 27 '10 at 1:17
    
@Muad'Dib: is this because the this.person can be null? or Is it because we don't want to raise the event if nothing is changed? –  VoodooChild Nov 27 '10 at 1:25
    
@VoodooChild because we don't want to raise the event. I mean, if you raise it and nothing has changed, then you are,essentially, lying. also, if you are unnecessarily raising the changed event, you are waisting cycles and slowing things down. –  Muad'Dib Nov 27 '10 at 2:19
    
@Muad'Dib: are we really slowing things down? I mean aren't we going through an extra step to check the equality now? –  VoodooChild Nov 27 '10 at 2:22
    
yes, that is 1 small step. think about it, though--if you are binding to the property (the main reason for raising a changed event), now you are setting in motion a whole slew of actions by saying it has changed, including a (relatively) expensive render –  Muad'Dib Nov 27 '10 at 2:25

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