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As we all know with Java comes the Collections API that provide us with numerous data structures that we can use.

I was wondering if there is some collection/tutorial/advice that could explain the situations and best Collection for the problem.

Example : LinkedHashMap is good for building LRU caches.

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marked as duplicate by Philipp, Raedwald, default locale, Tim B May 15 at 14:18

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Here is a tutorial that will reap dividends over and over: The Google Guide. In no time at all, you'll find the java Collections tutorial –  GregS Nov 27 '10 at 4:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This should give you a pretty good breakdown...

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I just came across this question but I recently posted a Q&A here What Java Collection should I use? that also answers this question.

Collections Flow Chart

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When you know another question where a question is already answered, please mark it as a duplicate. –  Philipp May 12 at 7:05

Just reading when to use what collection will only help you if you run across the exact same situation in your code. If you don't understand the roots of why a given data structure is good for a problem, you won't be able to apply this to your own code. This is why computer science is still important in programming...

So my roundabout answer, is take data structure classes or read data structure books, and understand how they work.

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There are enough answers provided already but I would like to augment those with few "application" areas where certain data structures are being used to solve problems

List of most of the data structures can be found on wikipedia here. Most of them have a "Applications" section that describes the problem domain it is solving

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