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Please show me optimized solutions for castings:

1)

    public static byte[] ToBytes(List<Int64> list)
    {
        byte[] bytes = null;

        //todo

        return bytes;
    }

2)

    public static List<Int64> ToList(byte[] bytes)
    {
        List<Int64> list = null;

        //todo

        return list;
    }

It will be very helpful to see versions with minimized copying and/or with unsafe code (if it can be implemented). Ideally, copying of data are do not need at all.

Update:

My question is about casting like C++ manner:

__int64* ptrInt64 = (__int64*)ptrInt8;

and

__int8* ptrInt8 = (__int8*)ptrInt64

Thank you for help!!!

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1  
do you want to convert each byte into a Int64 (and vice versa) or in chunks of 8 bytes? (sizeof Int64) –  BrokenGlass Nov 27 '10 at 4:45
    
@BrokenGlass i need to cast each 8 bytes (in chunks) to one Int64 value and vice versa;) –  Edward83 Nov 27 '10 at 4:48
1  
Are you asking for a BitConverter solution or a memcpy solution? –  Gabe Nov 27 '10 at 4:50
    
@Gabe i am asking ideally for casting if it was on C++: (__int8*)ptrInt64; (__int64*)ptrInt8; –  Edward83 Nov 27 '10 at 4:58
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3 Answers

Use Mono.DataConvert. This library has converters to/from most primitive types, for big-endian, little-endian, and host-order byte ordering.

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thank you! i will check it;) –  Edward83 Nov 27 '10 at 4:47
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Edit, fixed for correct 8 byte conversion, also not terribly efficient when converting back to byte array.

    public static List<Int64> ToList(byte[] bytes)
    {
        var list = new List<Int64>();
        for (int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; i += sizeof(Int64))
            list.Add(BitConverter.ToInt64(bytes, i));

        return list;
    }

    public static byte[] ToBytes(List<Int64> list)
    {
      var byteList = list.ConvertAll(new Converter<Int64, byte[]>(Int64Converter));
      List<byte> resultList = new List<byte>();

      byteList.ForEach(x => { resultList.AddRange(x); });
      return resultList.ToArray();
    }

    public static byte[] Int64Converter(Int64 x)
    {
        return BitConverter.GetBytes(x);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for help and your code! I need to cast each 8 bytes to one Int64 value and vice versa;) –  Edward83 Nov 27 '10 at 4:46
1  
@Edward83 edited by solution for correct byte conversion –  BrokenGlass Nov 27 '10 at 5:01
    
thank you!!! –  Edward83 Nov 27 '10 at 5:04
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CLR arrays know their types and sizes so you can't just cast an array of one type to another. However, it is possible to do unsafe casting of value types. For example, here's the source to BitConverter.GetBytes(long):

public static unsafe byte[] GetBytes(long value)
{
    byte[] buffer = new byte[8];
    fixed (byte* numRef = buffer)
    {
        *((long*) numRef) = value;
    }
    return buffer;
}

You could write this for a list of longs, like this:

public static unsafe byte[] GetBytes(IList<long> value)
{
    byte[] buffer = new byte[8 * value.Count];
    fixed (byte* numRef = buffer)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < value.Count; i++)
            *((long*) (numRef + i * 8)) = value[i];
    }
    return buffer;
}

And of course it would be easy to go in the opposite direction if this was how you wanted to go.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you!;) –  Edward83 Nov 27 '10 at 5:12
1  
Note that this always converts to/from host byte ordering. If you are using these functions to serialize data or otherwise package it for transport between computers, you should pick a specific byte ordering (big or little endian) and use it exclusively. Otherwise you will run into trouble when your software is run on a platform with the opposite byte ordering. –  cdhowie Nov 27 '10 at 7:18
1  
cdhowie: You're absolutely right about the byte ordering, but the OP was asking for how to cast arrays, which implies that he cares only about the host's byte ordering. –  Gabe Nov 28 '10 at 6:16
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