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I have got operator new working but as soon as I call delete, it crashes at the free (ptr) line. Can any one tell what I am doing wrong when overloading operator new and delete in this Base class? Hint: I am not asking about design issues.

class Base {
private: 
    int i;

public:  
    Base () : i (10) {
    }

    static void * operator new (size_t size) {  
       if (size = 0) size = 1;  // please read this line carefully! size = 0!
       return malloc (size);  
    }

    static void operator delete (void *ptr, size_t size) {
       if (ptr == NULL) return;
       free (ptr);
    }
};
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1  
Are you trying to delete an object twice or delete an object via a pointer not obtained from calling new? –  James McNellis Nov 27 '10 at 6:57
    
As a side note, free(NULL) is guaranteed to be safe (a no-op), so you don't have to special case it. –  Matthew Flaschen Nov 27 '10 at 7:14
    
hm...My bad: if you replace if (size==0) with if (size=0) and add a private data member as well as a constructor, the code will fail. I know size=0 is a bug which shouldn't happen but the code fails ONLY when you initialize a private data member of this class in the constructor. –  Jaywalker Nov 27 '10 at 7:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This works for me:

#include <cstdlib>
using namespace std;
class Base {
public:
    void * operator new(size_t size) {
       if (size == 0) size = 1;
       return malloc (size);
    }

    void operator delete (void *ptr, size_t size) {
       if (ptr == NULL) return;
       free (ptr);
    }
};

int main()
{
    Base* b = new Base;
    delete b;
    return 0;
}

hank@tardis:/tmp$ g++ -o test test.cpp 
hank@tardis:/tmp$ ./test 
hank@tardis:/tmp$ valgrind ./test 
==7229== HEAP SUMMARY:
==7229==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==7229==   total heap usage: 1 allocs, 1 frees, 1 bytes allocated
==7229== 
==7229== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
==7229== 
==7229== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==7229== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 4 from 4)
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Thanks. Yes, your code is fine. I have done some further changes in my code. Can you comment on that? –  Jaywalker Nov 27 '10 at 7:53

The actual problem is with neither new nor delete operators. Your implementation of them is pretty straightforward, there's no problem here.

The actual problem you have as heap corruption. It's caused by your code, not necessarily the code that manipulates Base objects. It's just the heap corruption gets discovered exactly when you delete your object.

Probably you have some code that does heap corruption just before you delete your object.

You should check your code for invalid memory access. This includes:

  1. Ensuring you don't access more memory than allocated
  2. Ensure you don't use memory after you free it.
  3. etc.
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I don't see any problem with the sample code you have given.

The following works fine for me.

prasoon@prasoon-desktop ~ $ cat leak_check.cpp && g++ leak_check.cpp && valgrind --leak-check=full ./a.out
#include <cstdlib>
class Base {
public:
    static void * operator new (size_t size) {
       if (size == 0) size = 1;
       return malloc (size);
    }

    static void operator delete (void *ptr, size_t size) {
       if (ptr == NULL) return;
       free (ptr);
    }
};

int main()
{
   Base * p = (Base *) Base::operator new(sizeof(Base));
   Base::operator delete((void*)p,sizeof(Base));
}
==4561== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==4561== Copyright (C) 2002-2009, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==4561== Using Valgrind-3.5.0 and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==4561== Command: ./a.out
==4561== 
==4561== 
==4561== HEAP SUMMARY:
==4561==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==4561==   total heap usage: 1 allocs, 1 frees, 1 bytes allocated
==4561== 
==4561== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
==4561== 
==4561== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==4561== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 17 from 6)

BTW freeing a null pointer is perfectly fine.

The free function causes the space pointed to by ptr to be deallocated, that is, made available for further allocation. If ptr is a null pointer, no action occurs.

So if (ptr == NULL) return; can be omitted.

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