Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I came across this unique practice in a browser detection script.

if (/MSIE/.test(_3)) {
    IE = true;
} else {
    if (/AppleWebKit/.test(_3)) {
        Safari = true;
    } else {
        if (/Opera/.test(_3)) {
            Opera = true;
        } else {
            if (/Camino/.test(_3)) {
                Camino = true;
            } else {
                if (/Firefox/.test(_3) || /Netscape/.test(_3) || ) {
                    Mozilla = true;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Are there any advantages to using this nested If/Else method?

What if I just changed it to:

 if (){
 } else if (){
 } else if (){
 } else if (){
 }

Would it run slower or anything?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In this case the switch statement could also be used? Something like:

switch ((_3).match(/msie|applewebkit|opera|camino|firefox/i)[0]) {
  case 'MSIE' : /* ...; */ break;
  case 'AppleWebKit' : /* ...; */ break;
  /* ... etc. */
  default: BrowserCouldntBeDetermined = true;
}

I adhere to the previous answer: else if() is equivalent to but more readable then else { if () ...}

Anyway, the code you found and presented looks a bit clumsy and not really fast for other reasons than the way if...else is used. Concerning the meaning of the code (and aside from the question), a better way to take care of browser differences is by object detection I would say.

share|improve this answer

It won't change anything other than the indentation and readability. Still the same code, absolutely equivalent :-) I would definitely change it though as it would make it more readable. Indentation usually means nesting whereas here there's no nesting.

share|improve this answer

This is known as "the arrow anti-pattern" (due to the resemblance to an arrowhead) ...

 if
   if
     if
       if
         do something
       endif
     endif
   endif
 endif

.. and it's almost always bad for readability, unless there is some compelling reason to leave it.

http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2006/01/flattening-arrow-code.html

I would flatten it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.