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Is there some good tool for removing unused local variables from free form Fortran code?

The background is that we have a codebase which is very large, and unused warnings has been disabled for the last 20 years, so there are quite a lot of them, too many to fix manually.

I know Photran has that kind of refactoring, but I tried it and ran into problems. For some reason it requires that the entire source code can be parsed (which it does not manage to do with our codebase) to do the refactoring, although for this refactoring it should IMO be enough to just check single files.

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1  
what format do the compiler warnings output as when you enable them? I think your best bet would be to create a script in Python or a similar scripting language to go and blank the lines that the compiler flags as declaring unused local variables. – TZHX Nov 27 '10 at 10:55
    
I get them in Intel fortran compiler format, with lines numbers and location on the line, so yes it would be possible to do it that way. But if there is some existing tool for the purpose using it would be quicker. – Jan Mattsson Nov 27 '10 at 11:15
    
Could you elaborate a bit on the last paragraph (regarding refactoring and single files)? I'm interested what you ment by that. – Rook Nov 27 '10 at 15:05
    
@Rook: For knowing whether a local variable is used or not, you do not need to look at anything else than the routine where it is declared. In Photran there is an entry "Remove unused local variables" in the refactoring menu, but it requires that every file in the project can be analyzed in order for it to work. – Jan Mattsson Nov 28 '10 at 16:06
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I've done this by hand, based on the compiler messages. One possible automatic tool: the writeup for SPAG / plusFORT says:

SPAG identifies, and optionally removes dead code (statements which could never be executed) and clutter (variables or PARAMETERs which are declared but never used).

I've used the free, reduced functionality version but don't remember whether that version removed unused variables.

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I have to check this one out, thanks! – Jan Mattsson Nov 28 '10 at 16:03

this is going as an answer, cause it can't fit in a comment box - don't think of it as an answer though, more of as a comment

Apart from that, sorry, but I don't think such a tool exists. TZXH asked what compiler you're using - not because it makes that much of a difference, but (I think) because maybe he was thinking of maybe parsing compiler warnings to get a list of variables, then going through Fortran files, and semi-manually removing those variables.

I've never done anything like that, but it's a process that could work. Has some potential drawbacks but it could work.

Apart from that, for analysis (and writing new one, for it is really a very nice IDE) of Fortran source code I found SciTools Understand a very helpful tool. Not sure whether it has a feature to do what you're asking, but it could help.

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There is a "prettify" Python script as part of the GPL CP2K toolchain. You can find it in in the CP2K project source repository. You will need the prettify.py and normalizeFortranFile.py scripts. Since it also tries to "prettify" the file, you will have to edit the script if you really only want to remove local variables.

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For gfortran you can use this perl script, the argument "build_log" should be the output of gfortran -Wunused (or whatever gets you unused variable warnings):

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;

my $build_log = shift;

open my $build_filehandle, "<", $build_log;

my $file;
my $line_to_edit;
my $col_to_edit;
my $word_to_remove;

my @files;
my @line_nums;
my @unused_variables;
my $line;

my $line_number = 0;
while($line = <$build_filehandle>)
{
    $line_number++;
    chomp($line);
    if($line =~ m/([^:]*):(\d+)\.(\d+):/)
    {
        $file = $1;
        $line_to_edit = $2;
        $col_to_edit = $3;
    }
    elsif($line =~ m/Warning: Unused variable '([^']*)'/)
    {
        $word_to_remove = $1;
        push(@files, $file);
        push(@line_nums, $line_to_edit);
        push(@unused_variables, $word_to_remove);
    }
}

close($build_filehandle);

# sort [file, line_num, word_to_remove] by files then line_nums then word_to_remove
my @merged_columns;
for(my $i = 0; $i < scalar(@files); $i++) # loop over all the replacements to be made
{
    push(@merged_columns, [$files[$i],$line_nums[$i],$unused_variables[$i]]);
}

# if sort is stable, sort by line_nums, then files
sub by_file_then_line
{
    $a->[0] cmp $b->[0] || # by file
    $a->[1] <=> $b->[1];
}

my @sorted_by_line_nums = sort by_file_then_line @merged_columns;

for(my $i = 0; $i < scalar(@files); $i++) # loop over all the replacements to be made
{
    $files[$i] = $sorted_by_line_nums[$i][0];
    $line_nums[$i] = $sorted_by_line_nums[$i][1];
    $unused_variables[$i] = $sorted_by_line_nums[$i][2];
}

my $print_line = 0;
my $last_file = 'null';
my $replacement_filehandle;
for(my $i = 0; $i < scalar(@files); $i++) # loop over all the replacements to be made
{
    if($files[$i] ne $last_file)
    {
        if(defined($replacement_filehandle))
        {
            # dump the line we were working on
            if($print_line == 1) # print the line that we were processing
            {
                print("$line\n");
                $print_line = 0;
            }

            # dump the rest of the file
            while($line = <$replacement_filehandle>)
            {
                chomp($line);
                print("$line\n");
            }
            # then close it
            close($replacement_filehandle);
        }
        open $replacement_filehandle, "+<", $files[$i];
        $line_number = 0;
    }
    $last_file = $files[$i];

# here we are on the right file, but might need to advance to the correct location
    while($line_number < $line_nums[$i]) # might not even enter
    {
        if($print_line == 1) # print the line that we were processing
        {
            print("$line\n");
            $print_line = 0;
        }
        $line = <$replacement_filehandle>;
        $line_number++;
        chomp($line);

        if($line_number < $line_nums[$i])
        {
            print("$line\n");
        }
    }
    $print_line = 1;

    if($line =~ m/^\s+type/i) # don't bother with types, their naming and form is too messed up to make it worth the effort, and there aren't that many
    {
        next;
    }

    $line =~ s/,/, /g; # add spaces after commas
    $line =~ s/,\s+/, /g; # collapse double commas

# case followed by stuff in parens
    $line =~ s/ ${unused_variables[$i]}\([^\)]*\),?//i;

# case followed by comma
    $line =~ s/ ${unused_variables[$i]},//i;

# case end of line
    $line =~ s/ ${unused_variables[$i]}\s*$//i;

# remove trailing commas
    $line =~ s/,\s*$//;

# collapse double commas
    $line =~ s/,\s*,/,/;

# remove empty memory declaration lines
# ie, if it does not have two sets of word characters kill it off
    if(! ($line =~ m/\w[^A-Za-z\*]+\w/))
    {
        $line = '';
    }
}


if(defined($replacement_filehandle))
{
    # dump the line we were working on
    if($print_line == 1) # print the line that we were processing
    {
        print("$line\n");
        $print_line = 0;
    }

    # dump the rest of the file
    while($line = <$replacement_filehandle>)
    {
        chomp($line);
        print("$line\n");
    }
    # then close it
    close($replacement_filehandle);
}

Obviously you should look at the source and check that it does what you want it to do. But roughly speaking it reads the compiler output and removes the variable that the compiler complains about on the line which it is complaining.

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PlusFORT is your only option and its not cheap. But it has been used on millions of lines of old Fortran (77) code and is fairly mature. For opinions try comp.lang.fortran

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We had a license for PlusFort at work, but there are some issues with preprocessor #include statements. If one #include file includes another one with #include, SPAG will not do clutter removal. – Jan Mattsson Nov 29 '10 at 16:45

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