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According to my small tests this code works. But, does it have undefined behaviour? Modifying the const object through the use of const_cast resulted in run-time access violations in my previous tests, but I can't remember how they were different. So, is there fundamentally something wrong here or not?

// test.h
#pragma once
#include <boost/array.hpp>

typedef boost::array<int,100000> bigLut_t;
extern const bigLut_t constBigLut;

// test.cpp
#include "test.h"

bigLut_t& initializeConstBigLut()
{
    bigLut_t* pBigLut = const_cast<bigLut_t*>( &constBigLut );

    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i) {
        pBigLut->at(i) = i;
    }
    return const_cast<bigLut_t&>(constBigLut);
}

const bigLut_t constBigLut = initializeConstBigLut();

// const_test.cpp
#include <iostream>
#include "test.h"

void main()
{
    for(int i = 0; i < 100; ++i) {
        std::cout << constBigLut[i] << std::endl;
    }
    system("pause");
}

(Notice that sizeof(bigLut_t) is too much to fit into the stack.)

EDIT: I actually like the idea in ybungalobill's small comment best for a method of initializing these big objects:

// test.h
#pragma once
#include <boost/array.hpp>

extern const struct BigLut : public boost::array<int,100000> {
    BigLut();
} constBigLut;

// test.cpp
#include "test.h"

const BigLut constBigLut;
BigLut::BigLut()
{
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i) {
        this->at(i) = i;
    }
}
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6  
Apart from the rest, void main is illegal in C++. main must always have return type int. You can safely omit the return statement, though. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 27 '10 at 12:15
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You modify an object defined as const. It doesn't matter when you do it, during initialization or not, it's still undefined behavior. Removing constness with const_cast is defined only if the const pointer was obtained from a non-const pointer to that object at some earlier stage. That's not your case.

The best thing you can do is

const bigLut_t& initializeConstBigLut()
{
    static bigLut_t bigLot;

    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i) {
        bigLut.at(i) = i;
    }
    return bigLut;
}

const bigLut_t constBigLut = initializeConstBigLut();

and hopefully the compiler will optimize out the static temporary.

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You are misusing the const_cast operator which is unfortunately possible, and in this case generates undefined behaviour... You can use dynamic initializer for constBigLut by invoking its implicit copy constructor (assuming that boost::array is the same concept as std::array):

struct bigLut_tinit  {  
  bigLut_t BigLut; 

  bigLut_tinit() {
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i) {  
        BigLut[i] = i;  
    }
  }
};

const bigLut_tinit constBigLut;

Edit: Seems that VC++10 perfectly applies RVO, so that the temporary is directly moved into the static duration object. So imho no need to declare local statics or references to tempraries...

Edit 2: Yeah, I missed the size issue. Recommend wrapping into a non-trivial type with constructor as above...

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The OP explicitly said that "sizeof(bigLut_t) is too much to fit into the stack." –  ybungalobill Nov 27 '10 at 12:10
1  
+1 for the struct idea. Actually you can make it even better: make the struct derive from bigLut_t, and then the code using constBigLut will be unchaged. –  ybungalobill Nov 27 '10 at 18:52
    
Actually I wouldn't do something like that at all... objects of static duration should only be an absolutely exceptional emergency solution. Deriving form std::array would make that even 'hackier' IMHO, since it'd clearly violate the purpose of inheritance. If something like this gets necessary, you'll probably have some kind of architectural problem, which should be solved first. If that does not work out, wrap something like bigLut_tinit instance into a safe singleton, so that it cannot be further misused... –  Paul Michalik Nov 28 '10 at 11:36
    
@paul_71: In order for my application to work, those global const objects always need to exist, so I don't see any reason to delay their initialization. Furthermore, the base class of constBigLut is not conceptually a singleton (and not necessarily std::array either). Meaning that I do need to (somewhere else in the code) construct and destruct objects of the same types as some of those global const objects are. Can you give me some other reason for why objects of static duration should only be an exceptional emergency solution, besides considering them as an architectural problem? –  zeroes00 Nov 29 '10 at 7:42
    
Isn't that enough? :) No, C++ statics have several inherent problems. –  Paul Michalik Nov 29 '10 at 18:40
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It is an UB, because that array could be stored in ROM.

You could do this :

// test.h
#include <boost/array.hpp>

typedef boost::array<int,100000> bigLut_t;
const bigLut_t& Lut();


// test.cpp
#include "test.h"

bool initialized=false;

const bigLut_t& Lut()
{
  static bigLut_t lut;

  if (!initialized)
  {
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i) {
        lut.at(i) = i;
    }
  }
    return lut;
}
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