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I'm trying to make a 100% height layout with a footer at the bottom. I have a site wrapper, in which I have two content divs. In the second content div I have a footer at the bottom. The problem is the top content div seems to be pushing the second content div beyond the website wrapper.

This is the code I'm experimenting with:

 <style type="text/css">
html, body { height:100%;}

#sitecontainer { 
    height:100%;
    border: medium #000 solid;
}
#contentcontainerone{
    border: medium #F00 solid;
}
#contentcontainertwo{
    height:100%;
    border: medium #00F solid;
    position:relative;
}
#footer{
    position:absolute;
    bottom:0;
    width:100%;
    text-align:center;
}
</style>
</head>

<body>
<div id="sitecontainer">
    <div id="contentcontainerone">
    Some content <br />
    Some content <br />
    Some content <br />
    Some content <br />
    Some content <br />
    </div>
    <div id="contentcontainertwo">
        <div id="footer">Footer</div>
    </div>
</div>
</body>

This is the link to the page: http://www.smsidat.com/test/index.html

What I basically want to achieve is that the website should always be 100% height wise and so stretch to the bottom of the browser window or where the content ends if it's of greater height with a footer at the bottom. So ideally, the div with the blue border should remain within the wrapper which has the black border and stretch no further than the bottom of the browser window or the end of the content if it's greater.

Would appreciate any ideas how to fix this, thanks.

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3 Answers 3

Here the solution:

html, body
{
height: 100%;
overflow: hidden;
}

#sitecontainer
{
height: 100%;
position: relative;
}

#footer /*OUTSIDE THE CONTAINER */
{
bottom: 0;
position: absolute;
height: 50px; /*change this*/

}

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - the issue with this code is that any content in container two will get cut off due to overflow:hidden –  SMSidat Nov 28 '10 at 11:30
    
Change overflow:hidden to overflow:auto and it will have a scrollbar. If this is not what you want then perhaps a 100% height is not what you are after, but you should let it flow out of the viewport? :) –  Bazzz Nov 28 '10 at 14:09

Using the <table> tag is indeed not recommended for layout. CSS3 has many ways to solve this as described above (use 100% height for the container and their parents all the way to the html tag). There are cases (ref: Eric Meyer, Smashing CSS book) however, when the CSS display: table-cell style attribute can be appropriate for layout ... such that at least it puts the layout control back in the CSS versus the content as a best-practice.

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Trying to align a DIV at the bottom of another div can be tricky. There are hackish ways to accomplish this but I would recommend just using a table.

<table>
    <tr>
        <td><div id="header"></div></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td><div id="content"></div></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td><div id="footer"></div></td>
    </tr>
</table>

Then use CSS to define the heights of each DIV, with the content DIV stretching with the page until overflow occurs while the header and footer DIVs stay at their original heights.

share|improve this answer
    
Using a table to fix this problem is a hack in itself. –  Rob Nov 27 '10 at 13:07
    
I wasn't suggesting to use a table to "fix" this problem. I was suggesting it as an alternative approach. The problem is that trying to set DIV heights to be relative can be tricky because there is no static height. Each browser handles these settings differently. Furthermore, he has 2 content DIVs, and to complicate things more, what if 1 of these content DIVs contains ANOTHER DIV he wants to stretch all the way? There's no easy way to do this with DIV positioning and relative height assignments via CSS. –  bitxwise Nov 27 '10 at 13:25
    
SMSidat asked how he can accomplish his goal of having a static header, footer, and content DIVs that grow/shrink with the expansion of the page. Using a table is a simplified approach. Frankly, marking my answer down and calling it a "hack" when it's really just an alternative (for the above reasons) dismisses the initial request for what seems like a DIV purist's pov... –  bitxwise Nov 27 '10 at 13:25
    
stop using tables for layout. –  Andrea Turri Nov 27 '10 at 14:29
1  
Tables can be abused (i.e. over-nesting resulting in maintenance issues and larger file sizes, poor separation of content and design, etc.). However, I think it's premature to automatically associate table layouts with poor design (i.e. "table hell"). Rather, even DIV layouts can be poorly implemented and abused resulting in "DIV hell". DIVs are not the golden hammer for layouts...I find it disappointing that people continue to write off certain things as ALWAYS good or ALWAYS bad. –  bitxwise Nov 27 '10 at 15:32

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