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I saw this amazing transition in an app: when the user clicks on an item in the tableview and it "drills down" the transition is done "on top" of a background. That is the background image is static and just the actual tableview and whatever is presented after pressing something is moving (from right to left as usual).

How is this layered tableview transition done? Anyone knows?

(the app is "Munch-5-a-day" in the info-view)

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2 Answers 2

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Endemic gives you the right direction. Another way can be view controllers with transparent background and then customize UIWindow.

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I did exactly that and it looks great. –  sebrock Nov 30 '10 at 21:53

UINavigationController is a subclass of the standard UIViewController class, so it inherits the view property of UIViewController. I would imagine that the background image transition consists of two important steps:

  1. Assign a UIImageView containing the desired background image to the view property of the NavController
  2. Set self.view.backgroundColor = [UIColor clearColor] in each ViewController, most likely in the viewDidLoad method.

I'm currently unable to test this, but it should work.

Reference: UINavigationController Class Reference

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Thing is when you press a button on the (mine at least) UITableView it loads a new XIB. Thats where the problem resides. Somehow the background view is shared between the XIB containing the tableview and the one that it loads? Or is this not a good way of implementing? –  sebrock Nov 27 '10 at 19:21
    
It might be easier to place the background image in the Resources folder and load it manually when you first initialize the NavController. –  Endemic Nov 28 '10 at 15:45

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