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I'm trying to get acquainted with python. Thought I'd solve that camel puzzle. This is the code I have so far. I have couple of problems now:

fCamel = 'F'
bCamel = 'B'
gap = 'G'

def solution(formation):
    return len([i for i in formation[formation.index(fCamel) + 1:] if i == bCamel]) == 0

def heuristic(formation):
    fCamels, score = 0, 0
    for i in formation:
        if i == fCamel:
            fCamels += 1;
        elif i == bCamel:
            score += fCamels;
        else:
            pass
    return score

def getneighbors (formation):
    igap = formation.index(gap)
    res = [[]]
    # AB_CD --> A_BCD | ABC_D | B_ACD | ABD_C
    def genn(i,j):
        temp = list(formation)
        temp[i], temp[j] = temp[j], temp[i]
        res.append(temp)

    if(igap > 0):
        genn(igap, igap-1)
    if(igap > 1):
        genn(igap, igap-2)
    if igap < len(formation) - 1:
        genn(igap, igap+1)
    if igap < len(formation) - 2:
        genn(igap, igap+2)

    return res

def astar (formation, heuristicf, solutionf, getneighborsf):
    openlist = [].append(formation)
    closedlist = []

#Example usage (I think)
#astar([fCamel, fCamel, fCamel, gap, bCamel, bCamel, bCamel], heuristic, solution, getneighbors)

I have couple of problems now.

  1. I need to have 3 more data fields along with a formation. g = current distance, f = total value (heuristic value + g), p = parent. How to make a structure including all these?
  2. I need to be able to determine if a given formation is in the closed list. Efficiently. How to do this?
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I need to have 3 more data fields along with a formation. g = current distance, f = total value (heuristic value + g), p = parent. How to make a structure including all these?

You should use a class to represent a formation:

class Formation(object):
    """A formation of camels."""
    def __init__(self, camels, parent):
        self.camels = camels
        self.current_distance = 0
        self.parent = parent

    @property
    def total_distance(self):
        """The total distance."""
        return self.current_distance + self.heuristic

The @property thing (called a decorator) modifies the following function so it looks like a property of the class. This is why Python doesn't bother with explicit accessor methods (i.e. things like GetDistance() and SetDistance); instead of making all properties look like methods, you make methods look like properties as needed. So, to get a formation's total distance, you just say theFormation.total_distance; no () after it.

I'm not familiar with the problem you're trying to solve, but I have a few comments on your code:

def solution(formation):
    return len([i for i in formation[formation.index(fCamel) + 1:] if i == bCamel]) == 0

This is actually better implemented as a standard loop. Writing it as a another property of the Formation class:

    @property
    def solution(self):
        for camel in self.camels[self.camels.index(fCamel) + 1:]:
            if camel == bCamel:
                return False
        return True

No point creating a list (len() won't operate on a generator) if you're just counting items. This can also be made a property.

Regarding heuristic, you don't need else: pass, you don't ned semicolons, and please do one assignment per line:

    @property
    def heuristic(self):
        fCamels = 0
        score = 0
        for camel in self.camels:
            if camel == fCamel:
                fCamels += 1
            elif camel == bCamel:
                score += fCamels
        return score

On to getneighbors. In genn, list(...) doesn't copy the list, it just takes whatever it's given and makes a list out of it. If its parameter is already a list, then it does nothing and returns the input. If you want to make a copy, you'll need to do from copy import copy and then use the copy function. (There's also a deep_copy function in the copy module.):

    def copy_swapping_camels(self, i, j):
        newCamels = copy(self.camels)
        newCamels[i], newCamels[j] = newCamels[j], newCamels[i]
        return Formation(newCamels, self)

    def get_neighbors(self):
        igap = self.camels.index(gap)
        result = [[]]

        if igap > 0:
            result.append(self.copy_swapping_camels(igap, igap - 1))
        if igap > 1:
            result.append(self.copy_swapping_camels(igap, igap - 2))
        if igap < len(self.camels) - 1:
            result.append(self.copy_swapping_camels(igap, igap + 1))
        if igap < len(self.camels) - 2:
            result.append(self.copy_swapping_camels(igap, igap + 2))

        return result

Here, doing two assignments on one line is okay because it's a swap (the assignments are related to each other).

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  1. You may want to use dict.
  2. If you are testing whether a single value is in a list, you can use the set.

    test_set = set(test_list)
    if your_var in test_set:
        # do something
    

But if you want to test whether a sequence is in a list efficiently, you need to implement some algorithms like string searching algorithms.

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