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I'm pretty new to Java and this has me really confused.

I have two classes. One (controlNumber) has two int fields used for numbers, one is the current number and one is the max number (once the current number reaches this it is reset to 1). The constructor initializes the current number to 1 and takes the max as a parameter (and checks that the max is positive and less than 100).
Of methods I have one that returns the current number, one that returns the max number, one that sets the max as the current, one that adds 1 to the current number (working its was towards the max) and lastly one that returns a String with the current number where it puts "0" in front if the current number is only one digit (so 5 becomes 05).
The toString looks like this:

public String toString()
    {
        if (currentNumber > 9) {
            return Integer.toString(currentNumber);
        }
        else {
            return ("0" + Integer.toString(currentNumber));
        }
    }

This class works just fine.
The second class is where I start running into problems. It has two fields which are of the class above. The constructor initializes them with two different max values. All this seems to be working.
Now I need a toString method which'll return a String with the current value of both fields, which a "/" between and "0" in front if it's one digit (so if day is 3 and month is 11 it'll return "03/11"). My first thought was just to use something like what I used above with Integer.toString, but it turns out that you can't do that (even though the fields in the controlNumber class are ints). So then I thought of using my method from above (which is in a different class) as it does most of what I want, but I don't know how.

I hope I've made sense and that someone can help me figure out how to solve my problem.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you have two fields of the type above, called a and b

public String toString() {
    return a + "/" + b;
}

You don't need to call toString() explicitly as that is the behaviour anyway. The only difference is that if a or b is null, this will print "null" whereas calling toString() will throw a NullPointerException.

BTW You can shorten your method to

public String toString() {
    return (currentNumber > 9 ? "" : "0") + currentNumber;
}
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Thanks. a and b can never be null (if they are my code has messed up badly :P). –  GeorgeWChubby Nov 27 '10 at 13:42
2  
Although using the ternary operator is a great improvement to what he had, I would say get into the habit of formatting strings properly. String.format("%1$" + n + "0", s); This would return a left padded string of 0's if the length of string s is less than n. So say n = 4 and s = "3", then the return would be "0003". –  bitxwise Nov 27 '10 at 13:46

I assume you mean have a class SomeClass that has two fields of type ControlNumber, and you want to implement SomeClass.toString() to print the combined values of the fields. If this is the case, then you would do something like this:

class SomeClass
{
    ControlNumber number1;
    ControlNumber number2;

    [...]

    public String toString()
    {
        return number1.toString() + "/" + number2.toString();
    }
}

Update:

As Peter has pointed out, the explicit calls to number.toString() can be left out, so the above could be rewritten as:

    public String toString()
    {
        return number1 + "/" + number2;
    }
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Thanks very much for your help –  GeorgeWChubby Nov 27 '10 at 13:42

The way I would approach this:

First, create an utility function for formatting integers:

public class StringUtil {

    public static String format(int i) {
        if (i > 9) {
            return String.valueOf(i);
        } else {
            return ("0" + String.valueOf(i));
        }
    }

}

Now, you can use this utility code from your other classes:

public String toString() {
    return StringUtil.format(currentNumber);
}

and

public String toString() {
    return StringUtil.format(max1) + "/" + StringUtil.format(max2);
}
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