Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Greetings! I am slightly confused about how does C# compiler perform its optimizations.
I have written the following getter to make up "lazy" initialization, and default value in case of null:

Static class Helper:

private static string host;  
public static string Host  
{        
    get  
    {  
        return host ?? (host= (ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Host"] ?? "host.ru"));  
    }  
}

Here is the result of disassembling by Reflector:

public static string Host 
{  
    get  
    {  
        if (Helper.host == null)  
        {  
            string host = Helper.host;  
        }  
        return (Helper.host = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Host"] ?? "host.ru");  
    }  
}

Looks like it would work in other way than assumed...

UPDATE

    private static string host;
    public static string Host
    {
        get
        {
            return host ?? (host = (GetVal() ?? "default"));
        }
    }
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        Console.WriteLine(Host);
        host = "overwritten";
        Console.WriteLine(Host);
    }
    static string GetVal()
    {
        return "From config";
    }

Works correctly (From config, overwritten), but Reflector shows the same:

public static string Host
{
    get
    {
        if (Program.host == null)
        {
            string host = Program.host;
        }
        return (Program.host = GetVal() ?? "default");
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
If you're using C# 4.0 I'd look at using the Lazy<T> class for Lazy instantiation. –  m-y Nov 27 '10 at 14:43
    
Looks quite strange to me. Almost looks like a bug in either reflector or C#. But a C# bug in such simple code sounds rather unlikely. –  CodesInChaos Nov 27 '10 at 14:46
    
Perhaps somebody who understand IL can check if it's a bug in reflector –  CodesInChaos Nov 27 '10 at 15:16
    
Such code works correctly in dummy console app, providing output as assumed. Looks like a bug in Reflector... Console.WriteLine(Host); host = "overwritten"; Console.WriteLine(Host); –  Cheerkin Nov 27 '10 at 15:17
    
You could post it in the reflector forums so they can confirm if it's a bug and fix it. –  CodesInChaos Nov 27 '10 at 15:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This looks like a bug in Reflector's C# disassembly.

Starting with this code:

public static string _test;
public static string _setting;

public static string Test_1
{
    get { return _test ?? (_setting ?? "default"); }
}

Reflector shows this C# disassembly:

public static string Test_1
{
    get
    {
        return (_test ?? (_setting ?? "default"));
    }
}

and the corresponding IL:

.method public hidebysig specialname static string get_Test_1() cil managed
{
    .maxstack 8
    L_0000: ldsfld string ConsoleApplication1.Program::_test
    L_0005: dup 
    L_0006: brtrue.s L_0017
    L_0008: pop 
    L_0009: ldsfld string ConsoleApplication1.Program::_setting
    L_000e: dup 
    L_000f: brtrue.s L_0017
    L_0011: pop 
    L_0012: ldstr "default"
    L_0017: ret 
}

I am not an IL expert, but this is my take on it:

  • L_0000:ldsfld pushes _test onto the evaluation stack
  • L_0005:dup copies the value (_test) that is topmost on the evaluation stack and pushes that onto the stack.
  • L_0006:brtrue.s pops the value created by dup off the stack and jumps to L_0017 if it is not null.
  • L_0008:pop at this point, _test is null, so pop that value off the stack.

and it continues to evaluate _setting in a similar fashion, finally returning "default" if _setting is also null.

Now, if we add an assignment into the code like this:

public static string Test_2
{
    get { return _test ?? (_test = (_setting ?? "default")); }
}

Reflector shows this C# disassembly:

public static string Test_2
{
    get
    {
        if (_test == null)
        {
            string text1 = _test;
        }
        return (_test = _setting ?? "default");
    }
}

which is not correct (if _test is not null, instead of returning _test, it assigns _setting or "default" to _test and then returns).

However, the IL dissassembly looks like the IL for Test_1, with a couple of extra instructions at L_0017 and L_0018 to do the assignment.

.method public hidebysig specialname static string get_Test_2() cil managed
{
    .maxstack 8
    L_0000: ldsfld string ConsoleApplication1.Program::_test
    L_0005: dup 
    L_0006: brtrue.s L_001d
    L_0008: pop 
    L_0009: ldsfld string ConsoleApplication1.Program::_setting
    L_000e: dup 
    L_000f: brtrue.s L_0017
    L_0011: pop 
    L_0012: ldstr "default"
    L_0017: dup 
    L_0018: stsfld string ConsoleApplication1.Program::_test
    L_001d: ret 
}

Finally, if you copy Reflector's C# dissembly and run it against the original, you'll see it produces different results.

using System;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            _test = "Test";
            Console.WriteLine(Test_2);
            Console.WriteLine(Reflector_Test_2);
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        public static string _test;
        public static string _setting;

        public static string Test_1
        {
            get { return _test ?? (_setting ?? "default"); }
        }

        public static string Test_2
        {
            get { return _test ?? (_test = (_setting ?? "default")); }
        }

        public static string Reflector_Test_2
        {
            get
            {
                if (_test == null)
                {
                    string text1 = _test;
                }
                return (_test = _setting ?? "default");
            }
        }
    }
}

Outputs

Test
default
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I have posted this issue to RedGate forum: red-gate.com/MessageBoard/viewtopic.php?p=44297 –  Cheerkin Nov 29 '10 at 10:27

I guess I don't understand - both code examples are synonymous.

Remember that Reflector cannot reproduce your exact syntax from the IL that the compiler generates. Sometimes the syntax will be different but the semantics and meaning of the code will always be the same.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see how these are synonymous. The first one calls(apart from thread-safty issues) the right expression only once, the second one calls it each time the getter is executed. –  CodesInChaos Nov 27 '10 at 14:42
    
Yes, that's what confuses me, actually. No "lazy-load" at all. –  Cheerkin Nov 27 '10 at 14:46
    
@Callum Rogers: I don't see how the second one is lazy. It calls ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Host"] everytime. Whereas the first one calls it only if host==null. And the if code in the second does nothing at all. It assigns to a local variable, but never reads it. –  CodesInChaos Nov 27 '10 at 14:52
    
Exactly, that "if" is completely pointless. –  Cheerkin Nov 27 '10 at 14:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.