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I have the following versions of Cygwin, yasm, gcc, and gdb:

CYGWIN_NT-5.1 Thorondor 1.7.7(0.230/5/3) 2010-08-31 09:58 i686 Cygwin
yasm 1.1.0.2352
gcc (GCC) 3.4.4 (cygming special, gdc 0.12, using dmd 0.125)
GNU gdb 6.8.0.20080328-cvs (cygwin-special)

I've compiled vp8 using the following commands:

$ ./configure --enable-debug
$ make

However when I try to debug using GDB, I get the following error:

$ gdb simple_decoder.exe
GNU gdb 6.8.0.20080328-cvs (cygwin-special)
Copyright (C) 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/
gpl.html>
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.  Type "show
copying"
and "show warranty" for details.
This GDB was configured as "i686-pc-cygwin"...
Dwarf Error: bad offset (0x4c4000) in compilation unit header (offset
0x0 + 6) [in module /cygdrive/
c/work/vp8/csim/build/simple_decoder.exe]
(gdb) q

Can someone help me out with this?

Thanks,

Arjun

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1 Answer

Your compiler and binutils are too old. This was solved circa 2000, the fault comes from the linker (see http://gcc.gnu.org/ml/gcc-bugs/2000-06/msg00768.html)

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$ ld --version GNU ld (GNU Binutils) 2.20.51.20100410 $ gcc --version gcc (GCC) 3.4.4 (cygming special, gdc 0.12, using dmd 0.125) –  Arjun Nov 29 '10 at 7:48
    
These seem to be the latest versions of ld and gcc as reported by Cygwin, so it doesn't seem like the error is due to outdated tools. –  Arjun Nov 29 '10 at 7:49
1  
GCC 3.4.4 is dated May 18, 2005. It is outdated, and Cygwin has modern compilers (package named gcc4, I believe) –  F'x Nov 29 '10 at 9:05
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