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I am setting up GIT on my server, when I SSH into my server I do:

ssh -i /path/to/key -p 30000 user@1.1.1.1

Now I setup GIT on the server, and I setup REMOTE like this:

remote add origin ssh://user@1.1.1.1:30000/path/to/git/repo/proj1

I'm getting the error:

push origin No refs in common and none specified; doing nothing. Perhaps you should specify a branch such as 'master'. fatal: The remote end hung up unexpectedly error: failed to push some refs to 'ssh://user@1.1.1.1:30000/path/to/git/repos/proj1'

So far in my local repo I did:

touch .gitignore
git add .
git commit -m 'init'

And my server has a git bare in it.

UPDATE

git push origin

git push origin
No refs in common and none specified; doing nothing.
Perhaps you should specify a branch such as 'master'.
fatal: The remote end hung up unexpectedly
error: failed to push some refs to 'ssh://git.myhost/home/myuser/gitrepos/csf'

My .ssh/config:

Host git.myhost
        User myuser
        Hostname 1.2.3.4
        Port 30000
        IdentityFile /home/myuser/.ssh/key_for_git
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You don't need to specify ssh:// for the remote, that's assumed. –  meagar Nov 27 '10 at 16:55
    
are you sure? that seems odd! –  Blankman Nov 27 '10 at 17:33
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

How about set up your host information in .ssh/config file; in this way you won't need the -i in both ssh and git.

Edit: little Googling I find this

https://git.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/GitTips#How_to_pass_ssh_options_in_git.3F

So the only solution other than .ssh/config is to use $GIT_SSH environment variable.

share|improve this answer
    
How to I use a .ssh/config file when I don't really have a HOST domain, I want to connect via SSH and server ip etc. –  Blankman Nov 27 '10 at 17:41
    
meaning, like: ssh://user@1.1.1.1:30000/path/to/git/repo/proj1 or would user@1.1.1.1. be my host? –  Blankman Nov 27 '10 at 17:42
    
Have your read the link I posted? It is the exact example for your saturation. –  timdream Nov 27 '10 at 17:44
    
Host is simply the name you make up; Your could use IP for the hostname, user for user, port for port, and /path/to/key to IdentityFile –  timdream Nov 27 '10 at 17:47
    
i didn't see port. Oh so host is really just a friendly name, not the exact host, gotcha thanks! trying it now! –  Blankman Nov 27 '10 at 17:49
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