Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a main TCL proc that sources tons of other tcl procs in other folders and subsequent subdirectories. For example, in the main proc it has:

source $basepath/folderA/1A.tcl
source $basepath/folderA/2A.tcl
source $basepath/folderA/3A.tcl
source $basepath/folderB/1B.tcl
source $basepath/folderB/2B.tcl
source $basepath/folderB/3B.tcl

and it seems kind of stupid to do it that way when I always know I will source everything in folderA and folderB. Is there a function (or simple way) that'll allow me to just source all the .tcl files in an entire folder?

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Building on ramanman's reply, heres a routine that tackles the problem using the built in TCL file commands and which works it way down the directory tree recursively.

# findFiles
# basedir - the directory to start looking in
# pattern - A pattern, as defined by the glob command, that the files must match
proc findFiles { basedir pattern } {

    # Fix the directory name, this ensures the directory name is in the
    # native format for the platform and contains a final directory seperator
    set basedir [string trimright [file join [file normalize $basedir] { }]]
    set fileList {}

    # Look in the current directory for matching files, -type {f r}
    # means ony readable normal files are looked at, -nocomplain stops
    # an error being thrown if the returned list is empty
    foreach fileName [glob -nocomplain -type {f r} -path $basedir $pattern] {
        lappend fileList $fileName
    }

    # Now look for any sub direcories in the current directory
    foreach dirName [glob -nocomplain -type {d  r} -path $basedir *] {
        # Recusively call the routine on the sub directory and append any
        # new files to the results
        set subDirList [findFiles $dirName $pattern]
        if { [llength $subDirList] > 0 } {
            foreach subDirFile $subDirList {
                lappend fileList $subDirFile
            }
        }
    }
    return $fileList
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jackson. I think we can put this all to rest now! –  Lyndon Jan 12 '09 at 21:14
1  
If you have a symbolic link that creates a cycle, you'll get the "too many nested evaluations (infinite loop?)" error. –  Joseph Bui Jan 15 '09 at 20:02

It gets trivial with tcllib on board:

package require fileutil
foreach file [fileutil::findByPattern $basepath *.tcl] {
    source $file
}
share|improve this answer

Perhaps a little more platform independent and using builtins commands instead of piping to a process:

foreach script [glob [file join $basepath folderA *.tcl]] {
  source $script
}

Repeat for folderB.

If you have more stringent selection criteria, and don't worry about running on any other platforms, using find may be more flexible.

share|improve this answer
    
The only thing I noticed is that this returns an error if no files match, but admittedly I did not check what the other answer did. –  Lyndon Jan 11 '09 at 8:50
    
use the -nocomplain option on the glob command to stop it throwing and error if an empty list is generated. –  Jackson Jan 12 '09 at 10:06

Same idea as schlenk:

package require Tclx
for_recursive_glob scriptName $basepath *.tcl {
    source $scriptName
}

If you only want folderA and folderB and not other folders under $basepath:

package require Tclx
for_recursive_glob scriptName [list $basepath/folderA $basepath/folderB] *.tcl {
    source $scriptName
}
share|improve this answer

Here is one way:

set includes [open "|find $basedir -name \*.tcl -print" r]

while { [gets $includes include] >= 0 } {
  source $include
}

close $includes
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This worked perfectly. –  Lyndon Jan 9 '09 at 21:27

Based on a previous answer, this version handles cycles created by symbolic links and in the process eliminates duplicate files due to symbolic links as well.

# findFiles
# basedir - the directory to start looking in
# pattern - A pattern, as defined by the glob command, that the files must match
proc findFiles {directory pattern} {

    # Fix the directory name, this ensures the directory name is in the
    # native format for the platform and contains a final directory seperator
    set directory [string trimright [file join [file normalize $directory] { }]]

    # Starting with the passed in directory, do a breadth first search for
    # subdirectories. Avoid cycles by normalizing all file paths and checking
    # for duplicates at each level.

    set directories [list]
    set parents $directory
    while {[llength $parents] > 0} {

        # Find all the children at the current level
        set children [list]
        foreach parent $parents {
            set children [concat $children [glob -nocomplain -type {d r} -path $parent *]]
        }

        # Normalize the children
        set length [llength $children]
        for {set i 0} {$i < $length} {incr i} {
            lset children $i [string trimright [file join [file normalize [lindex $children $i]] { }]]
        }

        # Make the list of children unique
        set children [lsort -unique $children]

        # Find the children that are not duplicates, use them for the next level
        set parents [list]
        foreach child $children {
            if {[lsearch -sorted $directories $child] == -1} {
                lappend parents $child
            }
        }

        # Append the next level directories to the complete list
        set directories [lsort -unique [concat $directories $parents]]
    }

    # Get all the files in the passed in directory and all its subdirectories
    set result [list]
    foreach directory $directories {
        set result [concat $result [glob -nocomplain -type {f r} -path $directory -- $pattern]]
    }

    # Normalize the filenames
    set length [llength $result]
    for {set i 0} {$i < $length} {incr i} {
        lset result $i [file normalize [lindex $result $i]]
    }

    # Return only unique filenames
    return [lsort -unique $result]
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.