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Just curious what the difference is between these two in a Rails gem:

write_inheritable_attribute(:sample, "sample")
self.sample = "sample"

I couldn't find any good documentation on write_inheritable_attribute, and was just reading through some gem source and found the former used a few times. Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

For a simple class or module, there wouldn't be a difference, but with more complex modules that may be loaded with multiple other modules, methods like write_inheritable_attribute can help you modify objects easily and reliably without having to worry about scope, private/protected methods and all kinds of interference from ruby metaprogramming magic like method_missing.

In short, when you write foo.sample = "sample" there are all kinds of things that may happen before, after, or instead of setting the attribute, especially if the object uses ActiveModel or an ORM. When you use foo.write_inheritable_attribute(:sample, "sample") you have much greater control over what happens.

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1  
Thanks. Still not sure I understand fully but appreciate the answer. –  Kevin Sylvestre Nov 30 '10 at 21:50
2  
It's hard to explain some of ruby's advanced features unless you get a lot of context. I highly recommend the book "Metaprogramming Ruby" for a great and approachable explanation of these kinds of features: pragprog.com/titles/ppmetr/metaprogramming-ruby –  bowsersenior Nov 30 '10 at 23:18
    
Thanks. It is on my bookshelf awaiting my eyes. I'll give it a crack this weekend probably. –  Kevin Sylvestre Nov 30 '10 at 23:34

Subclasses do not inherit instance variables:

>> class B ; @candy = 1 ; end
>> B.instance_variable_get :@candy          # => 1
>> class C < B ; end
>> C.instance_variable_get :@candy          # => nil

In rails, inheritable attributes provide a solution:

>> class B ; end
>> B.write_inheritable_attribute(:candy, 7) # => 7
>> class C < B ; end
>> C.read_inheritable_attribute(:candy)     # => 7
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Inheritable attribute was implemented mainly to address the problem where ruby class variable is shared across the class inheritance. Consider this example

class Counter
  @@count = 0
  def self.count
    @@count
  end

  def self.increment
    puts "==> #{self} increment"
    @@count += 1
  end
end

class DogCounter < Counter
end

puts "Counter.count:    #{Counter.count}"
puts "DogCounter.count: #{DogCounter.count} -> nice, DogCounter inherits @@count from Counter"

DogCounter.increment
puts "DogCounter.count: #{DogCounter.count} -> as expected"
puts "Counter.count:    #{Counter.count} -> but Counter.count is also changed!"

Counter.increment
puts "Counter.count:    #{Counter.count}"
puts "DogCounter.count: #{DogCounter.count} -> @@count is shared with all the descendants of Counter"

This will produce this output

Counter.count:    0
DogCounter.count: 0 -> nice, DogCounter inherits @@count from Counter
==> DogCounter increment
DogCounter.count: 1 -> as expected
Counter.count:    1 -> but Counter.count is also changed!
==> Counter increment
Counter.count:    2
DogCounter.count: 2 -> @@count is shared with all the descendants of Counter

Note that since Rails 3.2 write_inheritable_attribute has been removed. See http://dev.mensfeld.pl/2012/01/upgrading-to-rails-3-2-0-from-rails-3-1-3/

With class attribute (what used to be inheritable attribute) we can implement something like this:

class Counter
  class_attribute :count
  self.count = 0

  def self.increment
    puts "==> #{self} increment"
    self.count += 1
  end
end

class DogCounter < Counter
end

puts "Counter.count:    #{Counter.count}"
puts "DogCounter.count: #{DogCounter.count} -> nice, DogCounter inherits count from Counter"

DogCounter.increment
puts "DogCounter.count: #{DogCounter.count} -> as expected"
puts "Counter.count:    #{Counter.count} -> nice, it doesn't change count for Counter"

Counter.increment
puts "Counter.count:    #{Counter.count}"
puts "DogCounter.count: #{DogCounter.count} -> now each subclass can have their own class attribute that inherits default value from the superclass"

This will produce this output

Counter.count:    0
DogCounter.count: 0 -> nice, DogCounter inherits count from Counter
==> DogCounter increment
DogCounter.count: 1 -> as expected
Counter.count:    0 -> nice, it doesn't change count for Counter
==> Counter increment
Counter.count:    1
DogCounter.count: 1 -> now each subclass can have their own class attribute that inherits default value from the superclass
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