Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Weird trouble. I've used singleton multiple times but this particular case just doesn't want to work. Dump says that instance is null.

define('ROOT', "/");
define('INC', 'includes/');
define('CLS', 'classes/');

require_once(CLS.'Core/Core.class.php');

$core = Core::getInstance();

var_dump($core->instance);

$core->settings(INC.'config.php');
$core->go();

Core class

class Core
{
    static $instance;

    public $db;
    public $created = false;

    private function __construct()
    {
        $this->created = true;
    }   

    static function getInstance()
    {       
        if(!self::$instance) {
            self::$instance = new Core();
        } else {
            return self::$instance;
        }
    }

    public function settings($path = null)
    {
        ...
    }
    public function go()
    {
        ...
    }

}

Error code

Fatal error: Call to a member function settings() on a non-object in path

It's possibly some stupid typo, but I don't have any errors in my editor. Thanks for the fast responses as always.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You need to always return the singleton object from the singleton method, here you are not because you have an else statement, so the first invocation of getInstance will not return anything:

static function getInstance()
{       
    if(!self::$instance) {
        self::$instance = new Core();
    } else {
        return self::$instance;
    }
}

Your singleton method should look like this:

static function getInstance()
{       
    if(!self::$instance) {
        self::$instance = new Core();
    }
    return self::$instance;
}

Also, having an instance variable denoting whether an object was created is pretty much useless, because you can just compare if(self::$instance !== NULL) and you're good to go.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Also, I think that the $this->created bit (in the OP) is kind of useless, because technically (self::$instance !== null) and $this->created == true are equivalent. –  netcoder Nov 28 '10 at 0:00
    
@netcoder Thanks, added. –  Jacob Relkin Nov 28 '10 at 0:02
    
I know now - but I didn't realise that I had this error. Thanks –  Misiur Nov 28 '10 at 0:04
1  
+1 excellento Mr Relkin –  alex Nov 28 '10 at 0:07
    
@alex xDDDDDDDD –  Jacob Relkin Nov 28 '10 at 0:12

getInstance should always return a value -- needs to change like this:

static function getInstance()
{       
    if(!self::$instance) {
        self::$instance = new Core();
    }
    return self::$instance;
}
share|improve this answer

In addition to needing to change your getInstance() method to:

static function getInstance() {       
    if(!self::$instance) {
        self::$instance = new Core();
    }
    return self::$instance;
}

...you're also trying to dereference $instance from the instance itself in the following call:

var_dump($core->instance);

You should either be checking:

var_dump($core);

or

var_dump(Core::$instance);

...which, after the $core = Core::getInstance() call, should be the same object.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.