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I'm trying to write a sub that takes a coderef parameter. My sub does some initialization, calls the coderef, then does some cleanup.

I need to call the coderef using the same context (scalar, list, void context) that my sub was called in. The only way I can think of is something like this:

sub perform {
    my ($self, $code) = @_;

    # do some initialization...

    my @ret;
    my $ret;

    if (not defined wantarray) {
        $code->();
    } elsif (wantarray) {
        @ret = $code->();
    } else {
        $ret = $code->();
    }

    # do some cleanup...

    if (not defined wantarray) {
        return;
    } elsif (wantarray) {
        return @ret;
    } else {
        return $ret;
    }
}

Obviously there's a good deal of redundancy in this code. Is there any way to reduce or eliminate any of this redundancy?

EDIT   I later realized that I need to run $code->() in an eval block so that the cleanup runs even if the code dies. Adding eval support, and combining the suggestions of user502515 and cjm, here's what I've come up with.

sub perform {
    my ($self, $code) = @_;

    # do some initialization...

    my $w = wantarray;
    return sub {
        my $error = $@;

        # do some cleanup...

        die $error if $error;   # propagate exception
        return $w ? @_ : $_[0];
    }->(eval { $w ? $code->() : scalar($code->()) });
}

This gets rid of the redundancy, though unfortunately now the control flow is a little harder to follow.

share|improve this question
1  
I should also point out that if do some cleanup... were not necessary, the entire function could be reduced to return $code->(), and the context would automatically be inherited by the called subroutine. Unfortunately, though, the cleanup is necessary. –  Will Nov 28 '10 at 0:09
    
“perform”? Is this code for a circus? –  tchrist Nov 28 '10 at 2:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can exclude the !defined wantarray case early, because there is no cleanup to do (since $code->()'s result, if any, wasn't stored). That removes one case from the remaining function, making it simpler.

Second, you can move the cleanup stuff into its own function. Something like this came to my mind:

sub perform
{
    my($self, $code) = @_;
    if (!defined(wantarray)) {
            $code->();
            return;
    }
    return wantarray ? &cleanup($code->()) : &cleanup(scalar($code->()));
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Unfortunately the cleanup needs to happen always, even when called from void context. But I like your suggestion of using a separate cleanup subroutine to automatically supply context to the called subroutine. –  Will Nov 28 '10 at 0:40

I think I'd do it like this:

sub perform {
    my ($self, $code) = @_;

    # do some initialization...

    my @ret;
    if (not defined wantarray) {
        $code->();
    } else {
        @ret = wantarray ? $code->() : scalar $code->();
    }

    # do some cleanup...

    return wantarray ? @ret : $ret[0];
}

You still have two wantarray checks, but then your cleanup function was going to need one in order to correctly return the value(s) it was passed in. You don't need to worry about the undef case in the second check, because in that case it doesn't matter what perform returns.

share|improve this answer

Check out the Contextual::Return module on CPAN. I think it allows you to do what you want (and probably a whole lot more).

share|improve this answer
    
I second this. Even though it's the usual bizarre-Damianized interface, it does solve problems for this, even if it's overkill. –  Randal Schwartz Nov 28 '10 at 3:37
2  
I don't see how Contextual::Return adds anything except another dependency. This really isn't the problem it's trying to solve. It doesn't help you pass the correct context to the coderef, which is really the harder half of this problem. And return wantarray ? @ret : $ret[0]; is hardly complex enough to warrant loading a module to "simplify" it. –  cjm Nov 28 '10 at 6:06
    
@cjm: thanks for the edit...when is the CPAN page going to provide a generic link to whatever module? It is a nuisance - I haven't yet memorized the 'correct' way to get to a specific module without the version, and following your link ends up with the link I gave (today; I know it could change at any time). If there's meant to be a canonical link, it would be helpful if the site would give a way to get it! –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 28 '10 at 6:18
    
if you look in the upper right corner of the CPAN page (right above the picture of the author), you'll see the word "permalink". That's the link you want. –  cjm Nov 28 '10 at 6:41
    
@cjm: OK - thanks. Blind as ever... –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 28 '10 at 15:36

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