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I'm new to Haskell, so am sorry if this is incredibly obvious...


I have made the following function (used here as an example to ask about multiple value==something || value==somethingElse checks) to check if a character is a number:


isDigit :: Char -> Bool
isDigit x = 
    if 
    x == '0' 
    || x == '1'  
    || x == '2'  
    || x == '3'  
    || x == '4'  
    || x == '5'  
    || x == '6'  
    || x == '7'  
    || x == '8'  
    || x == '9'  
    then True  
    else False


Surely though there must be a neat way to write functions like the one above, so you don't have to repeat the || x == quite so much?



Thank you in advance for your help :)

(If it's relevant: I'm using Hugs as the interpreter.)

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4  
Since you're new to Haskell, and from your answer, I think that you should read and learn about Pattern Matching in Haskell. –  Lagerbaer Nov 28 '10 at 0:22
    
@Lagerbaer, what? You mean guards? This problem has no good use of pattern matching. –  luqui Nov 28 '10 at 0:37
    
Maybe. But his first solution could be made at least a bit nicer by not using if ... then but pattern matching instead. This shows me that he doesn't use pattern matching "as default" and hence it is something he should learn. –  Lagerbaer Nov 28 '10 at 0:42
1  
Aye, these things: learnyouahaskell.com/syntax-in-functions –  Rei Miyasaka Nov 28 '10 at 1:55
    
lol, thank you Rei. I've already found and read much of learnyouahaskell.com, definitely the best explainer of Haskell I've come across. –  Jon Nov 28 '10 at 3:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 29 down vote accepted

In this case you can use elem from the Prelude:

isDigit x = elem x "0123456789"

(Remember that strings are lists of Char)

Or you can use isDigit from Data.Char :-)

Yes, there is a neat way to write almost every repetitive pattern. Here's how to derive it for this one. Start with the list of chars (I'll just do 0-4 for brevity)

"01234"

Map the comparisons:

map (x ==) "01234"
  = [x == '0', x == '1', x == '2', x == '3', x == '4']
  = (x == '0') : (x == '1') : (x == '2') : (x == '3') : (x == '4') : []

Then use foldr. foldr f z is best described as a function that takes a list and replaces : with f and [] with z.

foldr (||) False (map (x ==) "01234")
  = x == '0' || x == '1' || x == '2' || x == '3' || x == '4' || False

And there you have it. foldr is kind of the granddaddy of list functions, so this is the "lowest level" way to do it without explicit recursion. Here are two more spellings for your vocabulary:

isDigit x = any (x ==) "0123456789"
isDigit x = or [ x == d | d <- "0123456789" ]

If I had to guess at the most common "idiomatic" spelling, it would probably be this variant of the first one:

isDigit = (`elem` "0123456789")

Once you get familiar with all the handy functions in the Prelude, writing code like this is a joyous breeze :-)

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Thank you. That was a very comprehensive answer, just what I was looking for :) –  Jon Nov 28 '10 at 0:45
3  
For completeness's sake, in this case, you can also have isDigit x = '0' <= x && x <= '9'. In general, though, you of course need `elem`. –  Antal S-Z Nov 28 '10 at 2:09
1  
If the checked elems are all consecutives, doing foo <= x && x <= bar is always better. –  FUZxxl Nov 28 '10 at 12:07

Another style issue that I didn't see mentioned already is that a function

if expr then True else False

is equivalent to simply

expr
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