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Is there an easy way to verify that an object belongs to a given class? For example, I could do

if(a.getClass() = (new MyClass()).getClass())
{
    //do something
}

but this requires instantiating a new object on the fly each time, only to discard it. Is there a better way to check that "a" belongs to the class "MyClass"?

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marked as duplicate by PearsonArtPhoto, Mena, toniedzwiedz, Ilya, ataylor Sep 26 '13 at 18:44

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

6 Answers 6

up vote 54 down vote accepted

The instanceof keyword, as described by the other answers, is usually what you would want. Keep in mind that instanceof will return true for superclasses as well.

If you want to see if an object is a direct instance of a class, you could compare the class. You can get the class object of an instance via the getClass() method. And you can statically access a specific class via ClassName.class.

So for example:

if (a.getClass() == X.class) {
  // do something
}

In the above example, the condition is true if a is an instance of X, but not if a is an instance of a subclass of X.

In comparison:

if (a instanceof X) {
    // do something
  }

In the instanceof example, the condition is true if a is an instance of X, or if a is an instance of a subclass of X.

Again, 99% of the time, instanceof is the correct approach.

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Use the instanceof operator:

if(a instanceof MyClass)
{
    //do something
}
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If you ever need to do this dynamically, you can use the following,

if (clazz.isInstance(a))
{
      // do something
}

where clazz is a Class object.

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or better yet, use IsAssignableFrom(Class) –  Chii Nov 28 '10 at 6:05
    
@Chii But then you need to call getClass on a again, which is what thebackhand was trying to avoid. –  gdejohn Nov 28 '10 at 9:13
    
no - all you need is references to the classes you want to compare - a.getClass().isAssignableFrom(MyClass.class) , or the other way around. –  Chii Nov 29 '10 at 8:29
    
@Chii That's assuming he knows what class he wants to compare to ahead of time. My answer was for doing it dynamically. –  gdejohn Nov 29 '10 at 11:36

Try operator instanceof.

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I agree with the use of instanceof already mentioned.

An additional benefit of using instanceof is that when used with a null reference instanceof of will return false, while a.getClass() would throw a NullPointerException.

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The usual way would be:

if (a instanceof A)

However, there are cases when you can't do this, such as when A in a generic argument.

Due to Java's type erasure, the following won't compile:

<A> boolean someMethod(Object a) {
    if (a instanceof A)
    ...
}

and the following won't work (and will produce an unchecked cast warning):

<A> void someMethod(Object a) {
    try {
        A casted = (A)a;    
    } catch (ClassCastException e) {
         ...
    }
}

You can't cast to A at runtime, because at runtime, A is essentially Object.

The solutions to such cases is to use a Class instead of the generic argument:

void someMethod(Object a, Class<A> aClass) {
    if (aClass.isInstance(a)) {
       A casted = aClass.cast(a);
       ...
    }
}

You can then call the method as:

someMethod(myInstance, MyClass.class);
someMethod(myInstance, OtherClass.class);
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