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I tried creating a class with one operator bool and one operator void*, but the compiler says they are ambigous. Is there some way I can explain to the compiler what operator to use or can I not have them both?

class A {
public:
    operator void*(){
        cout << "operator void* is called" << endl;
        return 0;
    }

    operator bool(){
        cout << "operator bool is called" << endl;
        return true;
    }
};

int main()
{
    A a1, a2;
    if (a1 == a2){
        cout << "hello";
    }
} 
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Are you sure you actually need both? operator void* functions as a slightly safer operator bool because there are fewer bad things you can accidentally do with a void*. Also google for safe bool idiom which minimizes abuse even further (by defining a operator pointer-to-member if I'm not mistaken). –  UncleBens Nov 28 '10 at 13:50
    
Actually, it was in reference to an answer I provided for ifstream. I was wondering why the operator void* was called prior to operator bool, but when I did this it was ambigous. –  Default Nov 28 '10 at 15:16
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could call the operator directly.

int main()
{
    A a1, a2;
    if (static_cast<bool>(a1) == static_cast<bool>(a2)){
        cout << "hello";
    }
} 

In this case, though, it looks like you should define operator==() and not depend on conversions.

share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't seem to be needed in this thread. How does ifstream resolve this? –  Default Nov 28 '10 at 1:43
    
.. because I have seen the operator bool() in istream, and in that thread, the operator void* is called. –  Default Nov 28 '10 at 1:48
    
accepted though, since operator==() resolved the issue (and let's me have both the conversion operators) –  Default Nov 28 '10 at 1:51
    
@Default: I doubt library streams have both. AFAIK, they only have operator void* and in C++0x they will have explicit operator bool instead. –  UncleBens Nov 28 '10 at 13:35
    
@Default: You can test with typedef std::basic_ios<char, std::char_traits<char> > bios; bool (bios::*p)()const = &bios::operator bool; void* (bios::*v)()const = &bios::operator void*; and see if both actually exist. –  UncleBens Nov 28 '10 at 13:41
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The problem here is that you're defining operator bool but from the sounds of it what you want is operator ==. Alternatively, you can explicitly cast to void * like this:

if ((void *)a1 == (void *)a2) {
    // ...
}

... but that's really bizarre. Don't do that. Instead, define your operator == like this inside class A:

bool operator==(const A& other) const {
    return /* whatever */;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Michael, +1. It's the iostreams that are confusing me.. –  Default Nov 28 '10 at 1:52
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