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Is there a way using Python's standard library to easily determine (i.e. one function call) the last day of a given month?

If the standard library doesn't support that, does the dateutil package support this?

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16  
Am I the only one who thought that you were asking for the Last Day of Monty Python? :D [20081124 Moved from reply to a comment --- the original reply was posted before the comment system was introduced on SO] –  onnodb Nov 24 '08 at 20:38

14 Answers 14

up vote 383 down vote accepted

I didn't notice this earlier when I was looking at the documentation for the calendar module, but a method called monthrange provides this information:

monthrange(year, month)
    Returns weekday of first day of the month and number of days in month, for the specified year and month.

>>> import calendar
>>> calendar.monthrange(2002,1)
(1, 31)
>>> calendar.monthrange(2008,2)
(4, 29)
>>> calendar.monthrange(2100,2)
(0, 28)

so:

calendar.monthrange(year, month)[1]

seems like the simplest way to go.

My previous answer still works, but is clearly suboptimal.

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EDIT: See @Blair Conrad's answer for a cleaner solution


>>> import datetime
>>> datetime.date (2000, 2, 1) - datetime.timedelta (days = 1)
datetime.date(2000, 1, 31)
>>>
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3  
I would actually call this cleaner, except for the fact that it fails in December when today.month + 1 == 13 and you get a ValueError. –  fletom Mar 18 '14 at 22:10

EDIT: see my other answer. It has a better implementation than this one, which I leave here just in case someone's interested in seeing how one might "roll your own" calculator.

@John Millikin gives a good answer, with the added complication of calculating the first day of the next month.

The following isn't particularly elegant, but to figure out the last day of the month that any given date lives in, you could try:

def last_day_of_month(date):
    if date.month == 12:
        return date.replace(day=31)
    return date.replace(month=date.month+1, day=1) - datetime.timedelta(days=1)

>>> last_day_of_month(datetime.date(2002, 1, 17))
datetime.date(2002, 1, 31)
>>> last_day_of_month(datetime.date(2002, 12, 9))
datetime.date(2002, 12, 31)
>>> last_day_of_month(datetime.date(2008, 2, 14))
datetime.date(2008, 2, 29)
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Another solution would be to do something like this:

from datetime import datetime

def last_day_of_month(year, month):
        """ Work out the last day of the month """
        last_days = [31, 30, 29, 28, 27]
        for i in last_days:
                try:
                        end = datetime(year, month, i)
                except ValueError:
                        continue
                else:
                        return end.date()
        return None

And use the function like this:

>>> 
>>> last_day_of_month(2008, 2)
datetime.date(2008, 2, 29)
>>> last_day_of_month(2009, 2)
datetime.date(2009, 2, 28)
>>> last_day_of_month(2008, 11)
datetime.date(2008, 11, 30)
>>> last_day_of_month(2008, 12)
datetime.date(2008, 12, 31)
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2  
Too complex, breaks the third rule of the zen of python. –  markuz Apr 1 '11 at 22:32
6  
Suboptimal solution, but it works. Doesn't deserve -3. +1 ;) –  Gringo Suave Jul 1 '11 at 20:24

If you don't want to import the calendar module, a simple two-step function can also be:

import datetime

def last_day_of_month(any_day):
    next_month = any_day.replace(day=28) + datetime.timedelta(days=4)  # this will never fail
    return next_month - datetime.timedelta(days=next_month.day)

Outputs:

>>> for month in range(1, 13):
...     print last_day_of_month(datetime.date(2012, month, 1))
...
2012-01-31
2012-02-29
2012-03-31
2012-04-30
2012-05-31
2012-06-30
2012-07-31
2012-08-31
2012-09-30
2012-10-31
2012-11-30
2012-12-31
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Really like your solution. Straight to the point and easily understood. –  pi. Oct 28 '14 at 14:17

This is actually pretty easy with dateutil.relativedelta (package python-datetutil for pip). day=31 will always always return the last day of the month.

Example:

from datetime import datetime
from datetime.relativedelta import relativedelta

date_in_feb = datetime.datetime(2013, 2, 21)
print datetime.datetime(2013, 2, 21) + relativedelta(day=31)
>>> datetime.datetime(2013, 2, 28, 0, 0)
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2  
I personally like relativedelta(months=+1, seconds=-1) seems more obvious what is going on –  BenH Mar 27 '13 at 18:14
    
You're wrong. datetime(2014, 2, 1) + relativedelta(days=31) gives datetime(2014, 3, 4, 0, 0)... –  Emmanuel Jun 18 '14 at 7:40
1  
you used days= instead of day= –  Vince Spicer Aug 26 '14 at 19:24
import datetime

now = datetime.datetime.now()
start_month = datetime.datetime(now.year, now.month, 1)
date_on_next_month = start_month + datetime.timedelta(35)
start_next_month = datetime.datetime(date_on_next_month.year, date_on_next_month.month, 1)
last_day_month = start_next_month - datetime.timedelta(1)
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This does not address the main question, but one nice trick to get the last weekday in a month is to use calendar.monthcalendar, which returns a matrix of dates, organized with Monday as the first column through Sunday as the last.

# Some random date.
some_date = datetime.date(2012, 5, 23)

# Get last weekday
last_weekday = np.asarray(calendar.monthcalendar(some_date.year, some_date.month))[:,0:-2].ravel().max()

print last_weekday
31

The whole [0:-2] thing is to shave off the weekend columns and throw them out. Dates that fall outside of the month are indicated by 0, so the max effectively ignores them.

The use of numpy.ravel is not strictly necessary, but I hate relying on the mere convention that numpy.ndarray.max will flatten the array if not told which axis to calculate over.

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For me it's the simplest way:

selected_date = date(some_year, some_month, some_day)

if selected_date.month == 12: # December
     last_day_selected_month = date(selected_date.year, selected_date.month, 31)
else:
     last_day_selected_month = date(selected_date.year, selected_date.month + 1, 1) - timedelta(days=1)
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from datetime import timedelta
(any_day.replace(day=1) + timedelta(days=32)).replace(day=1) - timedelta(days=1)
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If you wand to make your own small function, this is a good starting point:

def eomday(year, month):
    """returns the number of days in a given month"""
    days_per_month = [31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31]
    d = days_per_month[month - 1]
    if month == 2 and (year % 4 == 0 and year % 100 != 0 or year % 400 == 0):
        d = 29
    return d

For this you have to know the rules for the leap years:

  • every fourth year
  • with the exception of every 100 year
  • but again every 400 years
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Using relativedelta you would get last date of month like this

from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta
last_date_of_month = datetime(mydate.year,mydate.month,1)+relativedelta(months=1,days=-1)

The idea is to get the fist day of month and use relativedelta to go 1 month ahead and 1 day back so you would get last day of the month you wanted.

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>>> import datetime
>>> import calendar
>>> date  = datetime.datetime.now()

>>> print date
2015-03-06 01:25:14.939574

>>> print date.replace(day = 1)
2015-03-01 01:25:14.939574

>>> print date.replace(day = calendar.monthrange(date.year, date.month)[1])
2015-03-31 01:25:14.939574
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i have a simple solution:

import datetime   
datetime.date(2012,2, 1).replace(day=1,month=datetime.date(2012,2,1).month+1)-timedelta(days=1)
datetime.date(2012, 2, 29)
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This won't work for december; you cannot use 13 for a month value. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 15 '12 at 7:12

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