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I'm temped to use an int, and make 0 == NO, 1 == YES, and anything else == undefined. Obviously there are a million ways to do something like this, but what seems like the best way to you? Concerns I can think of include simplicity and memory footprint (e.g. what if I have a lot of these?).

Another way is to use two BOOLs, one for isDefined, and one for value

Another way,

typedef enum { CPStatusUndefined, CPStatusAvailable, CPStatusUnavailable } CPStatus;

Edit, the use case is:

I have a yes/no property that is difficult to calculate. When it is being checked, it is checked frequently (by UIMenuController, OFTEN), but unless the user selects it, it is never checked. The way I chose to deal with this is a tri-type variable. The first time you check, if it is undefined you calculate the yes/no value and return it, after that you just return the yes/no value.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use an enum. In Objective-C they work just like they do in C/C++

typedef enum {
  No = 0,
  Yes,
  Other
} tri_type;

tri_type myVar = No;

if( myVar == Yes || myVar == Other ) {
  // whatever
}
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2  
@Kenny Don't try to be too clever. Use an enum with a nice, meaningful name. –  willc2 Nov 28 '10 at 4:25
    
@Kenny, +1 for meaningful names. –  Lee Nov 28 '10 at 4:56
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How about NSNumber, since it can be nil?

[number boolValue] == YES;
[number boolValue] == NO;
[number boolValue] == nil; // or just number == nil
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if number is nil, then [number boolValue] will be NO. better to just check the variable itself. –  Dave DeLong Nov 28 '10 at 4:18
    
Do the boolean representations actually need to be true/false, or is the use case more just that there need to be three potential values (i.e. like an enum)? What exactly is the use case? –  d11wtq Nov 28 '10 at 4:21
    
@Dave Sorry, totally missed that you weren't the OP :) –  d11wtq Nov 28 '10 at 4:22
    
use case is I have a yes/no property that is difficult to calculate. When it is being checked, it is checked frequently (by UIMenuController, as much as 20 checks/sec), but unless the user selects it, it is never checked. Best way to handle this seems to be a tri-type. The first time you check, if it is undefined you calculate the yes/no value and return it, after that you just return the yes/no value. –  Kenny Winker Nov 29 '10 at 0:02
    
Absolutely should be an enum then, I agree with Lee, and your own instinct. –  d11wtq Nov 29 '10 at 0:13
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If you want to conserve the most amount of memory, use a char.

char == 0, false char == 1, true else, undefined.

Obviously, you'll want to initialize it at something like -1.

This is the way obj-c does comparator return values: if 0, they are equal. if positive, a > b if negative, a < b

Same idea as above.

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