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I'm creating an immutable simple graph class(it doesn't need to support loops or multiple edges). Each node is represented by an integer value, from 0 to numNodes.

This code works, but I think that the Linq query and for loop are rather ugly. Can you come up with a more clear way to populate _edges?

public class Graph {
    private IList<IList<int>> _edges;
    public int Nodes { get; private set; 
}

public Graph(int numNodes, IList<Tuple<int,int>> edges) {
    Nodes = numNodes;
    _edges = new List<IList<int>>();

    for(int i = 0; i < numNodes; i++) {
        _edges.Add(new List<int>(
        (from e in edges where e.Item1 == i 
        select e.Item2).Union(
        (from e in edges where e.Item2 == i
        select e.Item1).Distinct())));
    }
}

public IEnumerable<int> Neighbors(int node) {
    return _edges[node];
}
}
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3 Answers 3

What about something like this:

public class Graph2
{
    private IList<HashSet<int>> _edges;

    public int Nodes { get; private set; }

    public Graph2(int numNodes, IList<Tuple<int, int>> edges)
    {
        Nodes = numNodes;
        _edges = new List<HashSet<int>>(numNodes);
        for (int i = 0; i < numNodes; i++)
        {
            _edges.Add(new HashSet<int>());
        }

        foreach (var edge in edges)
        {
            _edges[edge.Item1].Add(edge.Item2);
            _edges[edge.Item2].Add(edge.Item1);
        }
    }

    public IEnumerable<int> Neighbors(int node)
    {
        return _edges[node];
    }
}

Using the HashSet means that you don't need to worry about duplicates or have the complicated Linq expression. You also only loop through edges once.

Unfortunately you still have the initial for loop to create the empty HashSets.

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public Graph(int numNodes, IList<Tuple<int, int>> edges)
{
    Nodes = numNodes;

    _edges = Enumerable.Range(0, numNodes).Select(num =>
                    edges.Where(x => x.Item1 == num).Select(x => x.Item2)
                            .Union(edges.Where(x => x.Item2 == num).Select(x => x.Item1))
                            .Distinct().ToList() as IList<int>
        ).ToList();
}
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Here is an alternative using group by:

public Graph(int numNodes, IList<Tuple<int, int>> edges) {
    Nodes = numNodes;
    _edges = new IList<int>[numNodes];
    var groups = from e in edges 
        group e by e.Item1 into g
        select new { Key = g.Key, Items = g.Select(s => s.Item2) };

    foreach (var grp in groups) {
        _edges[grp.Key] = grp.Items.ToList();
    }
}

This will avoid the initial for loop of initializing the edge collection, but you have to then take care when accessing neighbours of course.

Perhaps prettier is:

public class Graph {
    private IList<IEnumerable<int>> _edges;
    public int Nodes { get; private set; }    
    public Graph(int numNodes, IList<Tuple<int, int>> edges) {
        Nodes = numNodes;
        _edges = new IList<int>[numNodes];
        var groups = from e in edges
            group e by e.Item1 into g select g;

        foreach (var grp in groups) {
            _edges[grp.Key] = (from g in grp select g.Item2).ToList();
        }
    }

    public IEnumerable<int> Neighbors(int node) {
        return _edges[node];
    }
}
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