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I have a function search that search a list ('l') for key and returns True if found and False if not. I want it to return the index of key if found and False if not found but I'm confused on what my return statement should be. Here's my code:

def search(l,key):
    """
    locates key in list l.  if present, returns location as an index; 
    else returns False.
    PRE: l is a list.
    POST: l is unchanged; returns i such that l[i] == key; False otherwise.
    """

    if l:   # checks if list exists
        if l[0] == key:     # base case - first index is key
            return True

        s = search(l[1:], key)      # recursion
        if s is not False:          
            return s

    return False            # returns false if key not found

Any help would be greatly appreciated, Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Should be noted that I cannot use the built-in .index function or the in operator. I think i'm pretty close though without those. –  JMJY Nov 28 '10 at 5:59
    
Didn't see this comment that you can't use index. But the approach can be similar. Try it and post your answer here –  pyfunc Nov 28 '10 at 6:07
1  
Please make sure that your instructor knows that (a) you still pass when this blows up on a sufficiently long list (b) classes heavy on recursion are best taught in languages that support it. And if said instructor tries to get you to use setter or getters, give him/her afirm but not devastating smack upside the head and inform them that it's from aaronasterling. –  aaronasterling Nov 28 '10 at 6:15
    
@aaronasterling: +1 I guess, this is more of an introductory exercise to constrain them from using the facility available in python and come up with solution that respect those constraints. Of course, they should also tell them, why this solution is not suitable / inferior to other solutions in Python. I saw his comment much later after I posted my answer and also got a negative down vote for that. –  pyfunc Nov 28 '10 at 6:21
    
This isn't Python! Iterate over a list using a for loop and not using recursion. –  user97370 Nov 28 '10 at 11:19

4 Answers 4

For your base case you just found the item at index 0, right? Return 0.

if l[0] == key:     # base case - first index is key
    return 0

For your recursive part let's think about what to return. Let's say the item is at index 5. Since we've passed the recursive call a list that's shifted by one element, it's going to find it and return 4. (4, not 5. Do you see why?)

We need to add one to unshift the index before we return it.

s = search(l[1:], key)      # recursion
if s is not False:          
    return s + 1
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for a good explanation without doing the homework. I think it would be better to return None rather than False in the failure case (the function never returns True), but that may be a matter of taste. –  Johnsyweb Nov 28 '10 at 6:19
    
-1 for having the extremely ugly if is not False without explaining that it was necessitated by the extremely ugly API design. –  John Machin Nov 28 '10 at 6:55
    
Thanks John, I understand why you are adding one. Would this solution (without the argument 'idx') be more appropriate? or vice-versa? –  JMJY Nov 29 '10 at 23:31

you need to keep a track of the index. since your final return value [if a True search happens] is boolean, so you've got to change that.
I guess something like the code below should help you, but do test it thoroughly, as i'm only trying to get across the intent and have NOT tested the logic thoroughly -

def search(l,key,idx=0):
"""
locates key in list l.  if present, returns location as an index; 
else returns False.
PRE: l is a list.
POST: l is unchanged; returns i such that l[i] == key; False otherwise.
"""

if l:   # checks if list exists
    if l[0] == key:     # base case - first index is key
    return idx

    s = search(l[1:], key, (idx + 1))      # recursion
    if s is not False:          
        return s

return False            # returns false if key not found
share|improve this answer
    
@JMJY: This is the correct solution. Accept it. –  inspectorG4dget Nov 28 '10 at 6:51
    
@JMJY: inspectorG4dget is talking through his hat :-( –  John Machin Nov 28 '10 at 6:53
    
@inspectorG4dget: see my edited answer. –  John Machin Nov 28 '10 at 9:57
    
@JohnMachin: I have seen both your solutions now and +1 to them. I don't believe I saw your answer when I posted this comment. Look back at the time stamps. It seems that you may have posted your answer shortly after I posted my comment. –  inspectorG4dget Nov 28 '10 at 21:11
    
@inspectorg4dget: No "seems". My comment was indeed made before I posted my answer, and was quite valid in those circumstances ... you had not made a critical examination of the code that you were pushing as "the correct solution". –  John Machin Nov 29 '10 at 0:54

The problem is that you are slicing the tail of the list without preserving any information about where the slice took place.

In fact, you don't need to slice the list at all, since you can just do an indexed lookup in the list.

The algorithm for linear search is primitive recursive, and so if you can come up with an iterative solution, the recursive solution is trivially reachable (and visa versa).

So the iterative solution might look something like this:

for every integer i between zero and length of list
    if the element at position i in the list is equal to the key
        return i
else
   return "I couldn't find it"

We translating the iterative solution to a recursive one basically means turning the loop into a function call whose arguments are the values of the next loop iteration. The loop variables are i and the list being searched. In order to permit you learn from the exercise, I'll leave it at that.

share|improve this answer
    
I already know how to iterate over lists.. –  JMJY Nov 29 '10 at 23:28

Your API design is severely flawed.

>>> False == 0
True

Your instructor is setting you up for surprises. For example:

where = search(["non-foo", "not-foo"], "foo") # returns False
if where == 0:
    print "foo is in pole position"
    # but "foo" isn't even a candidate

Make it return None on failure. Try this:

>>> def search(alist, key, pos=None):
...     if pos is None: pos = len(alist) - 1
...     if pos < 0: return None
...     if key == alist[pos]: return pos
...     return search(alist, key, pos - 1)
...
>>> search([1,2,3], 4) # -> None
>>> search([1,2,3], 3)
2
>>> search([1,2,3], 2)
1
>>> search([1,2,3], 1)
0
>>> search([], 1) # -> None
>>>

Other features of this method: (1) Introduces you to the concept of "hidden" args which can be used where a local variable would be used in a non-recursive function. (2) Avoids the cost of all that string slicing.

=========================================

For the benefit of @inspectorG4dget, here's my refactoring of @anirvan's answer:

def xsearch(l,key,idx=0):
    if l:   # checks if list exists
        if l[0] == key:     # base case - first index is key
            return idx
        s = xsearch(l[1:], key, (idx + 1))      # recursion
        if s is not False:          
            return s
        #### and if s is False, it falls through and returns False ####
        #### so it can return s unconditionally!                   ####
    return False            # returns false if key not found

def ysearch(l,key,idx=0):
    if l:   # checks if list exists
        if l[0] == key:     # base case - first index is key
            return idx
        return ysearch(l[1:], key, (idx + 1))      # recursion
    return False            # returns false if key not found
    #### above statement is better put closer to the `if` ####

def zsearch(l,key,idx=0):
    if not l:   # checks if list exists
        return False
    if l[0] == key:     # base case - first index is key
        return idx
    return zsearch(l[1:], key, (idx + 1))      # recursion
share|improve this answer
    
Hey John, thanks for the help. I'm just wondering what the difference is between your xsearch, ysearch, and zsearch? Are you just condensing the code? –  JMJY Nov 29 '10 at 23:29
    
@JMJY: I was refactoring anirvan's code (xsearch) to remove unnecessary code, which had the side effect of causing the ugly "if s is not False" to vanish. Please note the comments that I added to the code during the process; I'll go back and highlight them with '####'. If by "just" you mean "merely", please rethink -- bloated code is bad code. –  John Machin Nov 30 '10 at 3:00
    
Thanks for the help, and the clarification. –  JMJY Nov 30 '10 at 22:24

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