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How do you extract form data (form[method="post"]) and file uploads sent from the HTTP POST method in Node.js?

I've read the documentation, googled and found nothing.

function (request, response) {
    //request.post????
}

Is there a library or a hack?

share|improve this question

16 Answers 16

up vote 229 down vote accepted

If you use Express (high-performance, high-class web development for Node.js), you can do this:

HTML:

<form method="post" action="/">
    <input type="text" name="user[name]">
    <input type="text" name="user[email]">
    <input type="submit" value="Submit">
</form>

JavaScript:

app.use(express.bodyParser());

app.post('/', function(request, response){
    console.log(request.body.user.name);
    console.log(request.body.user.email);
});

See also

share|improve this answer
34  
The functionality is actually in the BodyParser module in connect, if you want to use a lower level entry point. – Julian Birch Jun 20 '11 at 6:59
10  
I'm confused. How does name="user[email]" correspond to request.body.email ? – sbose Apr 16 '12 at 14:19
13  
God!! am getting mad having to read 3 doumentations at the same time for the same framework :/ nodejs.org/api/http.html , senchalabs.org/connect & expressjs.com/guide.html – Salman Abbas Jul 19 '12 at 10:58
13  
This didn't work for me until I added app.use(express.bodyParser());. – pettys May 9 '13 at 16:32
10  
I don't think the question was about express.. – Ghost Feb 17 '14 at 16:18

You can use the querystring module:

var qs = require('querystring');

function (request, response) {
    if (request.method == 'POST') {
        var body = '';

        request.on('data', function (data) {
            body += data;

            // Too much POST data, kill the connection!
            // 1e6 === 1 * Math.pow(10, 6) === 1 * 1000000 ~~~ 1MB
            if (body.length > 1e6)
                request.connection.destroy();
        });

        request.on('end', function () {
            var post = qs.parse(body);
            // use post['blah'], etc.
        });
    }
}

Now, for example, if you have an input field with name age, you could access it using the variable post:

console.log(post.age);
share|improve this answer
20  
bad idea. add some stuff for nuking requests when body becomes too big, or someone can kill node by uploading an endless file. – thejh Dec 27 '11 at 1:03
6  
@thejh Hm, that's a good point. It shouldn't be difficult to add that, though, so I'll leave it out of the example to keep things simple. – Casey Chu Dec 27 '11 at 6:48
213  
+1 for answering the question without referring to another lib – Trevor Jul 26 '12 at 1:49
24  
+1 for the same reason, finally someone that won’t link to a third-party library. – Mario Oct 26 '12 at 15:02
33  
node.js web server development is plagued with middlewarez that require you to study them for hours to save you minutes worth of coding. Let alone the scant documentation almost all of them offer. And your application ends up relying on the criteria of other people, not your's. Plus any number of performance issues. – Juan Lanus Apr 2 '13 at 13:16

Make sure to kill the connection if someone tries to flood your RAM!

var qs = require('querystring');

function (request, response) {
    if (request.method == 'POST') {
        var body = '';
        request.on('data', function (data) {
            body += data;
            // 1e6 === 1 * Math.pow(10, 6) === 1 * 1000000 ~~~ 1MB
            if (body.length > 1e6) { 
                // FLOOD ATTACK OR FAULTY CLIENT, NUKE REQUEST
                request.connection.destroy();
            }
        });
        request.on('end', function () {

            var POST = qs.parse(body);
            // use POST

        });
    }
}
share|improve this answer
30  
You may also return HTTP 413 Error Code (Request Entity Too Large) – neoascetic Jul 23 '12 at 2:03
    
Thank you for the code sir, does 1e6 equate to "1.0*106"? – SSH This Apr 5 '13 at 21:57
1  
@SSHThis: No, it's 1*10^6=1000000. – thejh Apr 6 '13 at 0:02
2  
var POST = qs.parse(body); // use POST only for noobs: when the name of the input text field is "user", Post.user will show the data of that field. e.g. console.log(Post.user); – Michael Moeller May 7 '13 at 22:05
2  
Can someone help, if I post {'Name':'Joe'} I get { {'Name':'Joe'} : '' } after qs.Parse(POST)... – Matt Canty May 10 '13 at 9:09

Here's a very simple no-framework wrapper based on the other answers and articles posted in here:

var http = require('http');
var querystring = require('querystring');

function processPost(request, response, callback) {
    var queryData = "";
    if(typeof callback !== 'function') return null;

    if(request.method == 'POST') {
        request.on('data', function(data) {
            queryData += data;
            if(queryData.length > 1e6) {
                queryData = "";
                response.writeHead(413, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'}).end();
                request.connection.destroy();
            }
        });

        request.on('end', function() {
            request.post = querystring.parse(queryData);
            callback();
        });

    } else {
        response.writeHead(405, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
        response.end();
    }
}

Usage example:

http.createServer(function(request, response) {
    if(request.method == 'POST') {
        processPost(request, response, function() {
            console.log(request.post);
            // Use request.post here

            response.writeHead(200, "OK", {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
            response.end();
        });
    } else {
        response.writeHead(200, "OK", {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
        response.end();
    }

}).listen(8000);
share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't this check be moved to a separate middleware so that it can check for too large requests on all post/put requests – Pavel Nikolov Feb 23 '13 at 12:17
    
@PavelNikolov this is meant mostly for the quick and dirty jobs, otherwise one is probably better off using Express like the accepted answer here recommends (which probably takes care of managing large requests as well). Feel free to modify and "fork" it to your liking though. – Mahn Feb 23 '13 at 13:24
    
What about the .read() method? Is that not supported by the http module? Eg. response.read() – B T Jul 12 '13 at 23:54
    
Hey, just curious - why have you placed the payload into the response object (response.post) rather than request object? – Jotham Apr 3 '14 at 4:48
    
@Jotham good question... I have no idea why didn't I notice that earlier, but there's no reason why it should be response.post rather than the more logical request.post. I updated the post. – Mahn Apr 3 '14 at 8:48

It will be cleaner if you encode your data to JSON, then send it to Node.js.

function (req, res) {
    if (req.method == 'POST') {
        var jsonString = '';

        req.on('data', function (data) {
            jsonString += data;
        });

        req.on('end', function () {
            console.log(JSON.parse(jsonString));
        });
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome.. Just does the required job. Thanks – Reddy Mar 17 '15 at 20:25
1  
This is what worked for me. Turns out the other solutions returned a string that looked like JSON but wasn't parsed. Instead of qs.parse(), JSON.parse() turned the body into something usable. Example: var post = JSON.parse(body);, then access the data with post.fieldname. (Moral of the story, if you're confused about what you're seeing, don't forget about typeof!) – wmassingham Mar 20 '15 at 0:19
    
Well just be aware that you must try-catch the JSON.parse function because if i want to crash your application ill just send a body with raw text. – ecarrizo Sep 14 '15 at 5:44
    
Thanks for the awesome answer, worked perfectly for me. – Shambo Dec 10 '15 at 6:03

For anyone wondering how to do this trivial task without installing a web framework I managed to plop this together. Hardly production ready but it seems to work.

function handler(req, res) {
    var POST = {};
    if (req.method == 'POST') {
        req.on('data', function(data) {
            data = data.toString();
            data = data.split('&');
            for (var i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
                var _data = data[i].split("=");
                POST[_data[0]] = _data[1];
            }
            console.log(POST);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can use body-parser, the Node.js body parsing middleware.

First load body-parser

$ npm install body-parser --save

Some example code

var express = require('express')
var bodyParser = require('body-parser')

var app = express()

app.use(bodyParser.urlencoded({ extended: false }))
app.use(bodyParser.json())


app.use(function (req, res) {
  var post_data = req.body;
  console.log(post_data);
})

More documentation can be found here

share|improve this answer

Here is how you can do it if you use node-formidable:

var formidable = require("formidable");

var form = new formidable.IncomingForm();
form.parse(request, function (err, fields) {
    console.log(fields.parameter1);
    console.log(fields.parameter2);
    // ...
});
share|improve this answer

And if you don't want to use the entire framework like Express, but you also need different kinds of forms, including uploads, then formaline may be a good choice.

It is listed in Node.js modules

share|improve this answer
    
Looks very promising. Will check this one out – nembleton May 11 '13 at 12:09

If you don't want to chunk your data together with the data callback you can always use the readable callback like this:

// Read Body when Available
request.on("readable", function(){
  request.body = '';
  while (null !== (request.body += request.read())){}
});

// Do something with it
request.on("end", function(){
  request.body //-> POST Parameters as String
});

This approach modifies the incoming request, but as soon as you finish your response the request will be garbage collected, so that should not be a problem.

An advanced approach would be to check the body size first, if you're afraid of huge bodies.

share|improve this answer
    
Convenient way to do it, but how do you "check the body size first" in a way that can't be fooled by a malicious request? – doug65536 Dec 11 '13 at 2:32
    
request is a normal node.js stream, so you can check the request.headers for the body length and abort the request if necessary. – Thomas Fankhauser Dec 11 '13 at 10:43

If you are using Express.js, before you can access to the req.body, you must add middleware bodyParser:

app.use(express.bodyParser());

Then you can ask for

req.body.user
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this is the best answer for me :) I'm using paraphraser without even knowing it. – Jamie Hutber Oct 6 '14 at 22:15

you can extract post parameter without using express.

1: nmp install multiparty

2: import multiparty . as var multiparty = require('multiparty');

3: `

if(req.method ==='POST'){
   var form = new multiparty.Form();
   form.parse(req, function(err, fields, files) {
      console.log(fields['userfile1'][0]);
    });
    }

4: and HTML FORM IS .

<form method=POST enctype=multipart/form-data>
<input type=text name=userfile1><br>
<input type=submit>
</form>

I hope this will work for you. Thanks.

share|improve this answer

Limit POST size avoid flood your node app. There is a great raw-body module, suitable both for express and connect, that can help you limit request by size and length.

share|improve this answer

I found a video which explains on how to achieve this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nuw48-u3Yrg

It uses default "http" module together with "querystring" and "stringbuilder" modules. The application takes two numbers (using two textboxes) from a web page and upon submit, returns sum of those two (along with persisting the values in the textboxes). This is the best example I could find anywhere else.

Related source code:

var http = require("http");
var qs = require("querystring");
var StringBuilder = require("stringbuilder");

var port = 9000;

function getCalcHtml(req, resp, data) {
    var sb = new StringBuilder({ newline: "\r\n" });
    sb.appendLine("<html>");
    sb.appendLine(" <body>");
    sb.appendLine("     <form method='post'>");
    sb.appendLine("         <table>");
    sb.appendLine("             <tr>");
    sb.appendLine("                 <td>Enter First No: </td>");

    if (data && data.txtFirstNo) {
        sb.appendLine("                 <td><input type='text' id='txtFirstNo' name='txtFirstNo' value='{0}'/></td>", data.txtFirstNo);
    }
    else {
        sb.appendLine("                 <td><input type='text' id='txtFirstNo' name='txtFirstNo' /></td>");
    }

    sb.appendLine("             </tr>");
    sb.appendLine("             <tr>");
    sb.appendLine("                 <td>Enter Second No: </td>");

    if (data && data.txtSecondNo) {
        sb.appendLine("                 <td><input type='text' id='txtSecondNo' name='txtSecondNo' value='{0}'/></td>", data.txtSecondNo);
    }
    else {
        sb.appendLine("                 <td><input type='text' id='txtSecondNo' name='txtSecondNo' /></td>");
    }

    sb.appendLine("             </tr>");
    sb.appendLine("             <tr>");
    sb.appendLine("                 <td><input type='submit' value='Calculate' /></td>");
    sb.appendLine("             </tr>");

    if (data && data.txtFirstNo && data.txtSecondNo) {
        var sum = parseInt(data.txtFirstNo) + parseInt(data.txtSecondNo);
        sb.appendLine("             <tr>");
        sb.appendLine("                 <td>Sum: {0}</td>", sum);
        sb.appendLine("             </tr>");
    }

    sb.appendLine("         </table>");
    sb.appendLine("     </form>")
    sb.appendLine(" </body>");
    sb.appendLine("</html>");
    sb.build(function (err, result) {
        resp.write(result);
        resp.end();
    });
}

function getCalcForm(req, resp, data) {
    resp.writeHead(200, { "Content-Type": "text/html" });
    getCalcHtml(req, resp, data);
}

function getHome(req, resp) {
    resp.writeHead(200, { "Content-Type": "text/html" });
    resp.write("<html><html><head><title>Home</title></head><body>Want to some calculation? Click <a href='/calc'>here</a></body></html>");
    resp.end();
}

function get404(req, resp) {
    resp.writeHead(404, "Resource Not Found", { "Content-Type": "text/html" });
    resp.write("<html><html><head><title>404</title></head><body>404: Resource not found. Go to <a href='/'>Home</a></body></html>");
    resp.end();
}

function get405(req, resp) {
    resp.writeHead(405, "Method not supported", { "Content-Type": "text/html" });
    resp.write("<html><html><head><title>405</title></head><body>405: Method not supported</body></html>");
    resp.end();
}

http.createServer(function (req, resp) {
    switch (req.method) {
        case "GET":
            if (req.url === "/") {
                getHome(req, resp);
            }
            else if (req.url === "/calc") {
                getCalcForm(req, resp);
            }
            else {
                get404(req, resp);
            }
            break;
        case "POST":
            if (req.url === "/calc") {
                var reqBody = '';
                req.on('data', function (data) {
                    reqBody += data;
                    if (reqBody.length > 1e7) { //10MB
                        resp.writeHead(413, 'Request Entity Too Large', { 'Content-Type': 'text/html' });
                        resp.end('<!doctype html><html><head><title>413</title></head><body>413: Request Entity Too Large</body></html>');
                    }
                });
                req.on('end', function () {
                    var formData = qs.parse(reqBody);
                    getCalcForm(req, resp, formData);
                });
            }
            else {
                get404(req, resp);
            }
            break;
        default:
            get405(req, resp);
            break;
    }
}).listen(port);
share|improve this answer

If it involves a file upload, the browser usually send it as a "multipart/form-data" content-type. You can use this in such cases

var multipart = require('multipart');
multipart.parse(req)

Reference 1

Reference 2

share|improve this answer

There are multiple ways to do it. However, the quickest way I know is to use the Express.js library with body-parser.

var express = require("express");
var bodyParser = require("body-parser");
var app = express();

app.use(bodyParser.urlencoded({extended : true}));

app.post("/pathpostdataissentto", function(request, response) {
  console.log(request.body);
  //Or
  console.log(request.body.fieldName);
});

app.listen(8080);

That can work for strings, but I would change bodyParser.urlencoded to bodyParser.json instead if the POST data contains a JSON array.

More info: http://www.kompulsa.com/how-to-accept-and-parse-post-requests-in-node-js/

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