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How do you extract form data (form[method="post"]) and file uploads sent from the HTTP POST method in node.js? I've read the docs and Googled and found nothing.

function (request, response) {
    //request.post????
}

Is there a library or a hack?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 154 down vote accepted

If you use Express (High performance, high class web development for Node.js), you can do this:

HTML:

<form method="post" action="/">
    <input type="text" name="user[name]">
    <input type="text" name="user[email]">
    <input type="submit" value="Submit">
</form>

Javascript:

app.use(express.bodyParser());

app.post('/', function(request, response){

    console.log(request.body.user.name);
    console.log(request.body.user.email);

});

See also

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25  
The functionality is actually in the BodyParser module in connect, if you want to use a lower level entry point. –  Julian Birch Jun 20 '11 at 6:59
8  
I'm confused. How does name="user[email]" correspond to request.body.email ? –  sbose Apr 16 '12 at 14:19
3  
req.body.user == {name: 'some value', email: 'some value'}. It looks like there is a typo above –  Stephen May 12 '12 at 19:30
5  
God!! am getting mad having to read 3 doumentations at the same time for the same framework :/ nodejs.org/api/http.html , senchalabs.org/connect & expressjs.com/guide.html –  SalmanPK Jul 19 '12 at 10:58
9  
This didn't work for me until I added app.use(express.bodyParser());. –  pettys May 9 '13 at 16:32

It will be cleaner if you encode your data to JSON, then send it to node.

    function (req, res) {
        if (req.method == 'POST') {
            var jsonString = '';
            req.on('data', function (data) {
                jsonString += data;
            });
            req.on('end', function () {
                 console.log(JSON.parse(jsonString));
            });
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
var qs = require('querystring');

function (request, response) {
    if (request.method == 'POST') {
        var body = '';
        request.on('data', function (data) {
            body += data;

            // Too much POST data, kill the connection!
            if (body.length > 1e6)
                req.connection.destroy();
        });
        request.on('end', function () {
            var post = qs.parse(body);

            // use post['blah'], etc.
        });
    }
}
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13  
bad idea. add some stuff for nuking requests when body becomes too big, or someone can kill node by uploading an endless file. –  thejh Dec 27 '11 at 1:03
5  
@thejh Hm, that's a good point. It shouldn't be difficult to add that, though, so I'll leave it out of the example to keep things simple. –  Casey Chu Dec 27 '11 at 6:48
122  
+1 for answering the question without referring to another lib –  Trevor Jul 26 '12 at 1:49
13  
+1 for the same reason, finally someone that won’t link to a third-party library. –  Alec Oct 26 '12 at 15:02
16  
node.js web server development is plagued with middlewarez that require you to study them for hours to save you minutes worth of coding. Let alone the scant documentation almost all of them offer. And your application ends up relying on the criteria of other people, not your's. Plus any number of performance issues. –  Juan Lanus Apr 2 '13 at 13:16

here is how you can do it if you use node-formidable

var formidable = require("formidable");

var form = new formidable.IncomingForm();
form.parse(request, function (err, fields) {
    console.log(fields.parameter1);
    console.log(fields.parameter2);
    // ...
});
share|improve this answer

Here's a very simple no-framework wrapper based on the other answers and articles posted in here:

var http = require('http');
var querystring = require('querystring');

function processPost(request, response, callback) {
    var queryData = "";
    if(typeof callback !== 'function') return null;

    if(request.method == 'POST') {
        request.on('data', function(data) {
            queryData += data;
            if(queryData.length > 1e6) {
                queryData = "";
                response.writeHead(413, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'}).end();
                request.connection.destroy();
            }
        });

        request.on('end', function() {
            request.post = querystring.parse(queryData);
            callback();
        });

    } else {
        response.writeHead(405, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
        response.end();
    }
}

Usage example:

http.createServer(function(request, response) {
    if(request.method == 'POST') {
        processPost(request, response, function() {
            console.log(request.post);
            // Use request.post here

            response.writeHead(200, "OK", {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
            response.end();
        });
    } else {
        response.writeHead(200, "OK", {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
        response.end();
    }

}).listen(8000);
share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't be response.writeHead(413, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'}); ? –  Mark Oct 3 '12 at 1:25
    
@Mark true, well spotted, fixed. –  Mahn Oct 3 '12 at 2:38
1  
@Mahn Not super important, but it seems util isn't being used –  Kevin Reilly Nov 7 '12 at 22:43
    
@KevinReilly yep, removed, thanks. –  Mahn Nov 29 '12 at 1:17
    
Shouldn't this check be moved to a separate middleware so that it can check for too large requests on all post/put requests –  Pavel Nikolov Feb 23 '13 at 12:17

If you don't want to chunk your data together with the data callback you can always use the readable callback like this:

// Read Body when Available
request.on("readable", function(){
  request.body = '';
  while (null !== (request.body += request.read())){}
});

// Do something with it
request.on("end", function(){
  request.body //-> POST Parameters as String
});

This approach modifies the incoming request, but as soon as you finish your response the request will be garbage collected, so that should not be a problem.

An advanced approach would be to check the body size first, if you're afraid of huge bodies.

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Convenient way to do it, but how do you "check the body size first" in a way that can't be fooled by a malicious request? –  doug65536 Dec 11 '13 at 2:32
    
request is a normal node.js stream, so you can check the request.headers for the body length and abort the request if necessary. –  Thomas Fankhauser Dec 11 '13 at 10:43

If you are using express, before you can access to the req.body you must add middleware bodyParser

app.use(express.bodyParser());

Then you can ask for

req.body.user
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Make sure to kill the connection if someone tries to flood your RAM!

var qs = require('querystring');

function (request, response) {
    if (request.method == 'POST') {
        var body = '';
        request.on('data', function (data) {
            body += data;
            // 1e6 === 1 * Math.pow(10, 6) === 1 * 1000000 ~~~ 1MB
            if (body.length > 1e6) { 
                // FLOOD ATTACK OR FAULTY CLIENT, NUKE REQUEST
                request.connection.destroy();
            }
        });
        request.on('end', function () {

            var POST = qs.parse(body);
            // use POST

        });
    }
}
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23  
You may also return HTTP 413 Error Code (Request Entity Too Large) –  neoascetic Jul 23 '12 at 2:03
    
Thank you for the code sir, does 1e6 equate to "1.0*106"? –  SSH This Apr 5 '13 at 21:57
    
@SSHThis: No, it's 1*10^6=1000000. –  thejh Apr 6 '13 at 0:02
    
where do you define the name of the post? ex: $_POST['????'] –  t q Apr 24 '13 at 17:12
    
@tq: in this case, POST[name] (e.g. POST["foo"]). –  thejh Apr 24 '13 at 21:43

And if you don't want to use the entire framework like Express, but you also need different kinds of forms, including uploads, then formaline may be a good choice.

It is listed in Node.js modules

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Looks very promising. Will check this one out –  nembleton May 11 '13 at 12:09

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