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I have a simple (very simple:) ) client and server which can send text messages over TCP, It's flawed because I don't know how to listen to the messages and print them on the screen as well as send messages at the same time (for both client and server).

Also I have difficulty in presenting all the sent and received messages between the client and server in the order the messages were sent.

For example on the server side the chat may look like this

Server:Hi there
Client:Hi

And on the client side the same chat looks like this

Client:Hi
Server:Hi there

The messages are in different order and both users see differently. My main question is, how would I go about synchronizing the output so that they both see the same thing?

Keeping in mind what I mentioned earlier about not knowing how to listen and send simultaneously, this is the message loop for the sever and client.

Server message loop

    while(true){
        cout<<"-[SERVER]: ";
        getline(cin,send_text);
        if (sizeof(send_text) > 0 ){
            bytes_out = send(client,send_text.c_str(),send_text.length()+1,0);
            cout<< endl;
            if (bytes_out == SOCKET_ERROR){
                cout<<"-[SERVER error in sending.]" << endl;
                break;
            }
        }

        bytes_in = recv(client,recvd_text,sizeof(recvd_text),0);
        if (bytes_in > 0 ){
            cout<<"-[CLIENT]: " << recvd_text << endl;  //output on screen
        }
        if (bytes_in == 0){
            cout<<"-[CLIENT has disconnected.]" << endl;
            break;
        }
        if (bytes_in == SOCKET_ERROR){
            cout<<"-[CLIENT closed unexpectedly.]" << endl;
            break;
        }
    }

Client message loop

    while (true){
        cout<<"-[CLIENT]: ";
        getline(cin,send_text);
        if(sizeof(send_text) > 0){
            bytes_out = send(con_sock,send_text.c_str(),send_text.length()+1,0);
            if (bytes_out == SOCKET_ERROR){
                cout<<"-[CLIENT error in sending.]" << endl;
                break;
            }
        }

        bytes_in = recv(con_sock,recvd_text,sizeof(recvd_text),0);
        if (bytes_in > 0){
            cout<<"-[SERVER]: " << recvd_text << endl;
        }
        if (bytes_in == 0){
            cout<<"-[Server has disconnected." << endl;
            break;
        }
        if (bytes_in == SOCKET_ERROR){
            cout<<"-[Server closed unexpectedly." << endl;
            break;
        }
    }
    return true;
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The core problem is how to wait for incoming messages and for user input at the same time. (Once you'll be able to do it, the "synchronization" will follow naturally, since messages will be displayed as they are sent or received).

The solution to this problem is using select. select can wait for input on several file handles (e.g. standard input and a socket) and return when there's data available. You can then handle the data: if it's from the socket, display it. If it's from the user, send it to the remote host.

Here's an example chat client/server program using select. (The example is in Python not C++, but the principle is the same).


Windows-specific

In Windows, select() is provided by the Winsock library and only works on sockets. To wait for input from the console and from a network socket, it looks like you will need to use a combination of WaitForMultipleObjects, GetStdHandle and WSAEventSelect. In Unix-like environments it's much simpler because the standard input and sockets are all file descriptors.

A simpler solution in Windows would be a message-passing based one. Use a window for the text input, and use WSAAsyncSelect to get a message when network input is ready.

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1  
The example you used is python. The OP is using C++. –  Default Nov 28 '10 at 10:30
1  
Oops. I guess all those strings in square brackets made me think about Python lists :) –  Amnon Nov 28 '10 at 10:46
    
hehe my bad. Got caught up in how it looks, only can do so much in console :). –  silent Nov 28 '10 at 13:46
    
@Amnon and Default, can you please look at my new thread?. –  silent Nov 29 '10 at 7:47
1  
@sil3nt: you're using Windows? you're in trouble. See the updated answer here. –  Amnon Nov 29 '10 at 10:07

In some sense, this is a question about internet protocols. Most application protocols would solve this by including a kind of acknowledgment response when the message successfully reaches its definition. Such a communication might look something like this:

  1. Server sends some kind of header identifying a chat message, with the contents "Hi there".
  2. Client receives chat message, and replies with a different header indicating acknowledgment.
  3. Server receives the client's acknowledgment, and then prints the message to the screen.

The operating system technically already does this as part of TCP, but this is probably the easiest way to accomplish something similar at the application level.

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1  
The OP has the TCP stream ordered correctly. The bug is that their polling approach won't let them get file and socket io in order. –  Tobu Nov 28 '10 at 11:08
    
The stream is ordered correctly, but send() does not block waiting for a full message exchange with the remote host. Instead, it only waits for the data to be successfully enqueued with the kernel, which means a message from the remote host might be received in the meantime. If this happens, and messages are displayed immediately, they could appear out-of-order. –  Justin Spahr-Summers Nov 28 '10 at 11:10
    
hmm.. are there any other ways?. Because tracking the headers would be a hassle, also it would mean I have to distinguish between a message and a header on receiving. I changed my code to have one server listen in on two connected clients and pass on the information but I'm still having the same problem. –  silent Nov 28 '10 at 13:44
    
Probably a dumb Idea but is there a way of running a timer on each client and synchronize the two? (Any other alternative would be awesome), Also I'm moving to win32 api and giving it a display and text area to type, so I'm guessing the wait-send-recv delay problem wont be an issue then. –  silent Nov 28 '10 at 13:48

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