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I have this code:

var Person = {
 "name": "",
 "changes": {
  "name to": function(value) {
   this["name"] = value;
  }
 }
}

var Josh = Object.create(Person);
Josh["changes"]["name to"]("John");

console.log(Josh.name); // nothing
console.log(Josh.changes.name); // "John"

The problem is that this above refers to Object "changes" and not object instance "Josh".

I can't replace this with Person because then it's referring to the object "Person" and not to the object instance "Josh".

Is it possible to refer to Josh's name?

share|improve this question
    
What is the "changes" object for? It doesn't appear to serve any purpose. It'd be more natural to have a Person.changeName() function. –  John Kugelman Nov 28 '10 at 8:33
    
This was just a simplification of the actual implementation. The principle is the same though. –  ajsie Nov 28 '10 at 8:34
1  
From an OO pov, it seems a bit strange. An object is supposed to encapsulate data and methods to operate on that data. You're isolating your methods to another object. –  Martin Algesten Nov 28 '10 at 8:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why don't you use the more common form of Javascript OOP?

function Person() {
    this.name = "";
    this.changes = {};
    var _this = this;
    this.changes.nameTo = function(name) {
        _this.name = name;
    }
}

var Josh = new Person();
Josh.changes.nameTo("John");

console.log(Josh.name); // "John"
console.log(Josh.changes.name); // undefined
share|improve this answer

Sadly not. You don't have any reference to an enclosing instance of the object you're in currently. You need to move the method to the outer Person object.

var Person = {
 "name": "",
 "changeNameTo": function(value) {
   this["name"] = value;
 }
}

Edit: If you absolutely want the original structure, albeit strange from an OO perspective. You need to give the inner object a reference to the outer. Programatically you can do it as below - or perhaps do it in a constructor, depending on your framework providing the Object.create() method.

var Person = {
 "name": "",
 "changes": {
  "name to": function(value) {
   this.data["name"] = value;
  }
 }
}

var Josh = Object.create(Person);
Josh.changes.data = Josh;

Josh["changes"]["name to"]("John");
share|improve this answer
    
Isn't it possible to use caller/callee to get the first object called: Josh["changes"]["name to"]("John") which in this case is Josh? –  ajsie Nov 28 '10 at 8:38
    
Ha! Yeah, I suppose - but that's so obscure, I'd completely forgotten about it. Seems it's deprecated even stackoverflow.com/questions/103598/… –  Martin Algesten Nov 28 '10 at 8:41
    
Do you know how I could use caller/callee in my case to get Object Josh? –  ajsie Nov 28 '10 at 8:47
    
Hm.. on second thoughts, I was confused. Josh["changes"]["name to"]("John"); The arguments.callee is the inner function, but arguments.callee.caller is (of course) not the outer. –  Martin Algesten Nov 28 '10 at 8:56

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