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The following query counts the common neighbors of two nodes in the graph:

    DECLARE @monthly_connections_test TABLE (
  calling_party VARCHAR(50)
  , called_party VARCHAR(50))

INSERT INTO @monthly_connections_test
          SELECT 'z1', 'z2'
UNION ALL SELECT 'z1', 'z3'
UNION ALL SELECT 'z1', 'z4'
UNION ALL SELECT 'z1', 'z5'
UNION ALL SELECT 'z1', 'z6'
UNION ALL SELECT 'z2', 'z1'
UNION ALL SELECT 'z2', 'z4'
UNION ALL SELECT 'z2', 'z5'
UNION ALL SELECT 'z2', 'z7'
UNION ALL SELECT 'z3', 'z1'
UNION ALL SELECT 'z4', 'z7'
UNION ALL SELECT 'z5', 'z1'
UNION ALL SELECT 'z5', 'z2'
UNION ALL SELECT 'z7', 'z4'
UNION ALL SELECT 'z7', 'z2'

SELECT     monthly_connections_test.calling_party AS user1, monthly_connections_test_1.calling_party AS user2, COUNT(*) AS calling_calling, 0 AS calling_called, 
                      0 AS called_calling, 0 AS called_called, 0 AS both_directions
FROM         @monthly_connections_test AS monthly_connections_test INNER JOIN
                      @monthly_connections_test AS monthly_connections_test_1 ON 
                      monthly_connections_test.called_party = monthly_connections_test_1.called_party AND 
                      monthly_connections_test.calling_party < monthly_connections_test_1.calling_party
GROUP BY monthly_connections_test.calling_party, monthly_connections_test_1.calling_party

For the following graph alt text

it returns the number of common neighbors which are called by user1 AND user2 so for example the number of neighbors called by z1 AND z2 it returns 2 as both call z4 and z5.

Another thing I would like to count is the number of all neighbors of two nodes (users) which are called either by user1 or user2 so for example for the pair (z1, z2) the query should return 5 (user z1 calls z2, z3, z4, z5, z6 and user z2 calls z1, z4, z5, z7 - the connections between z1 and z2 have to be exluded as (z1, z2) is the observed pair and the number of elements in (z3, z4, z5, z6) U (z4, z5, z7) is 5).

Does anyone know how to modify/create the join query for the above logic?

Thank you!

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For such questions it is better to have a script with: 1) Create table and 2) Inserts. It would be easier to play with data and find optimal way faster. Thanks –  Genius Nov 28 '10 at 10:30
    
Thank you for the suggestion! –  Niko Gamulin Nov 28 '10 at 11:01
    
I strongly recommend using abbreviated table aliases rather than repeating the table name at full length: @monthly_connections_test AS mct. In the context, I'd use mct1 and mct2, or even m1 and m2. It makes the SQL more readable (and helps you avoid horizontal scroll bars - but that's less important than the improved readability!). –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 28 '10 at 16:36
    
Why have you asked this same question, with minor variations, five (5) times and accepted answers for some of them? –  RC_Cleland Nov 28 '10 at 17:22
    
@RC_Cleland: The graph is the same indeed but these minor variations can play a big difference. By now the answers reffering to to this graph were accepted for each question. –  Niko Gamulin Nov 28 '10 at 20:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

@Martin's answer is correct. He's a genius.

Go Martin!

CORRECTION

His answer works with 1 small modification if run against the bidirectional solution I gave. Otherwise the results are incorrect.

So your answer his his and mine :)

The full solution:

DECLARE @T1 TABLE (calling_party VARCHAR(50), called_party VARCHAR(50))

INSERT  INTO @T1
SELECT  *
FROM    dbo.monthly_connections_test

INSERT  INTO @T1
SELECT  *
FROM    (
        SELECT  called_party AS calling_party, calling_party AS called_party
        FROM    dbo.monthly_connections_test AS T2
        WHERE   T2.called_party < T2.calling_party
        ) T2
WHERE   NOT EXISTS (
        SELECT *
        FROM    monthly_connections_test
        WHERE   calling_party = T2.calling_party and called_party = T2.called_party
)

select u1, u2, count(called_party) called_parties 
from (
select distinct u1, u2, called_party from 
(
        select a1.calling_party u1, a2.calling_party u2 from 
        (select calling_party from @T1 group by calling_party) a1,
        (select calling_party from @T1 group by calling_party) a2
) pairs,
 @T1 AS T
where
(u1 <> u2) and 
((u1 = t.calling_party and u2 <> t.called_party) or
(u2 = t.calling_party and u1 <> t.called_party))
) res
group by u1, u2
order by u1, u2
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much :). If I'm reading this correctly, your transformation code adds the inverse relation (eg z6->z1 for z1->z6). It really depends on what you want: If you want the users who had a call with user1 or user2 then you need the fix, if you only want users who where actively called by u1 or u2, then not. –  Martin Nov 28 '10 at 19:46
    
Correct. My code adds in the incoming calls, effectively making the table unidirectional. I'm still missing why your code needs it since you don't have any < operations, so I don't see why it's limited. –  IanC Nov 28 '10 at 19:52
    
From comparing the results, it seems that without the transformation, users who didn't also call the initial caller are missed (the opposite of what you said in your comment). E.g. z6 is added by the transform, and per the graph, is only called but doesn't call. –  IanC Nov 28 '10 at 19:59

I don't have SQL Server here, but this should work:

select u1, u2, count(called_party) called_parties 
from (
select distinct u1, u2, called_party from 
(
    select a1.calling_party u1, a2.calling_party u2 from 
        (select calling_party from @monthly_connections_test group by calling_party) a1,
        (select calling_party from @monthly_connections_test group by calling_party) a2
) pairs,
 @monthly_connections_test t
where 
(u1 = t.calling_party and u2 <> t.called_party) or
(u2 = t.calling_party and u1 <> t.called_party)
) res
group by u1, u2;

The pairs subquery simple creates all possible pairs of users, you probably have a userlist somewhere else.

share|improve this answer
    
this solution is clever, but is it scalable? On this small dataset it creates 294 records to process. This expands exponentially with the original data. –  IanC Nov 28 '10 at 17:24
    
I do think so. Most DBs will never expand the inner query (ie it will count the rows as it finds them, not create a giant temp table and then count). There's only one full scan of monthly_connections_test (ignoring the pairs query), so it should be quite cheap. –  Martin Nov 28 '10 at 17:39
    
I'd love to test it... it's a clever solution. The only thing I don't get is why it needs my transformation code in order to work 100%. How did you figure it out? It's quite "outside the box". –  IanC Nov 28 '10 at 18:42
    
Don't know, it just came to me, I guess :). I think you could just union monthly_connections_test with itself (with the columns reversed) to get the bidirectional result. –  Martin Nov 28 '10 at 19:50
    
I spent quite some time (I won't say how much ;) playing with the union idea. I knew exactly what it needed to do, but couldn't get it to work. This type of SQL is not my usual, which is why I spent time on it. I like challenges. –  IanC Nov 28 '10 at 20:08

Out of interest, doesn't z1 also call z2 and vice-versa, making the desired result (z2, z3, z4, z5, z6) U (z1, z4, z5, z7) is 7?

Would a COMPUTE operation give you the count you want?

share|improve this answer
    
z1 and z2 should be excluded as we are looking for neighbors of z1 and z2 –  Niko Gamulin Nov 28 '10 at 10:17
    
This is a complex query to manually reconstruct. May I suggest you include a CREATE TABLE script with the required INSERTS so that community members can easily work on this case. –  IanC Nov 28 '10 at 10:22
    
+1 for a real challenge! –  IanC Nov 28 '10 at 11:40

Niko, I believe there is a missing data point in your table example for this question. I have added the following for my testing.

UNION ALL SELECT 'z1', 'z6'

I have two simple queries to answer the questions:

"the number of common neighbors which are called by user1 AND user2 "

" I would like to count is the number of all neighbors of two nodes (users) which are called either by user1 or user2"

declare @Party1 varchar(10)
declare @Party2 varchar(10)
set @Party1 = 'z1'
set @Party2 = 'z2'
select count(distinct called_party) AS 'Total calls 2 neighbors' 
from @monthly_connections_test
WHERE calling_party in (@Party1, @Party2)
AND called_party not in (@Party1 , @Party2)

;With cteAllCalls(x) as
(
Select called_party from @monthly_connections_test 
where called_party != @Party1 and calling_party = @Party2
 )

select Count(X) AS 'Total common calls' from cteAllCalls
inner join @monthly_connections_test on x = called_party
and called_party != @Party2 and calling_party = @Party1
share|improve this answer
    
I give the solution to this "missing data point". However, I don't believe the solution involves setting two parties. Since this is a graph, the result set should automatically permute to the cross-join of all input data. –  IanC Nov 28 '10 at 14:18
    
Thank you for the suggestion RC_Cleland. The problem however as IanC mentioned is that the query has to automatically find all the permutations without manually declaring which combination to count for. –  Niko Gamulin Nov 28 '10 at 14:49

Ok, this is a seriously tough nut to crack!

The first problem is that the data is bidirectional in the table. The first step to solving this is the make the data unidirectional.

DECLARE @T1 TABLE (calling_party VARCHAR(50), called_party VARCHAR(50))
DECLARE @T2 TABLE (calling_party VARCHAR(50), called_party VARCHAR(50))

INSERT  INTO @T1
SELECT  *
FROM    dbo.monthly_connections_test

INSERT  INTO @T1
SELECT  *
FROM    (
        SELECT  called_party AS calling_party, calling_party AS called_party
        FROM    dbo.monthly_connections_test AS T2
        WHERE   T2.called_party < T2.calling_party
        ) T2
WHERE   NOT EXISTS (
        SELECT *
        FROM    monthly_connections_test
        WHERE   calling_party = T2.calling_party and called_party = T2.called_party
)

INSERT  INTO @T2
SELECT  DISTINCT TOP (100) PERCENT calling_party, called_party
FROM    @T1
WHERE   calling_party < called_party
UNION
SELECT  DISTINCT TOP (100) PERCENT called_party AS calling_party, calling_party AS called_party
FROM    @T1
WHERE   calling_party > called_party

The above fully solves any bidirectional issues by unwrapping the data into a distinct 1:1 relationship. The result is only 9 records that represent every relation as per the original data.

We (yes, after these hours, this is my problem now too) should be able to query the result to get the neighbors as desired. This is the next hurdle...

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