Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Okay. . . pointers are driving me bonkers!!! Okay, now that I have that out of my system, the following code compiles, however, it does not print out the correct output. What am I doing wrong?

    #ifndef _TERM_H
    #define _TERM_H

    class Term {

    public:
    //constructors
    Term( Rational &a, const int &b)
    {   
    this->coefficient = a;
    this->exponent = b;
    }

    ~Term () {}    

   //coefficient

   Rational getCoefficient()const{
    return coefficient;
   }

   //exponent

   int getExponent()const{
    return exponent;
   }

   //print the Term
   void print()const {

   cout << &Term::coefficient << " x^"  << &Term::exponent << endl;
   }    

   private:
   Rational coefficient, a; 
   int exponent, b;
   };

   #endif 

   #ifndef _RATIONAL_H
   #define _RATIONAL_H

   class Rational {

   public:
   //constructors
   Rational( const int &a, const int &b){
    if (a != 0)
        if (b != 0)
            this->numerator = a;
            this->denominator = b;
   }

   Rational(){}

   ~Rational() {}

      .....

   private:
   int a, b, numerator, denominator;


   };

   #endif

Okay, so when I input values (2/5) for my Rational number and i input 2 for my exponent (I am supposed to get( 2/5 x ^2)) I get 1 X^1. Huh? I am running out of hair to pull out. . .

share|improve this question
    
Just a (possibly) unrelated note: in the constructor of Rational, you need brackets around the two assignments. As it is, the second assignment is outside the scope of both if statements. – suszterpatt Nov 28 '10 at 13:04
    
For some weird reason I have a feeling this is a Python programmer learning C++. – whatnick Nov 28 '10 at 13:08
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why is print

//print the Term
   void print()const {

   cout << &Term::coefficient << " x^"  << &Term::exponent << endl;
   }    

Instead of just

void print() const
{
   cout << coefficient << " x^" << exponent << end;
}

?

share|improve this answer
    
Because when I do I get a million error messages like: – Mike Nov 28 '10 at 13:10
    
: error C2679: binary '<<' : no operator found which takes a right-hand operand of type 'const Rational' (or there is no acceptable conversion) 1> c:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 9.0\VC\include\ostream(653): could be 'std::basic_ostream<_Elem,_Traits> &std::operator <<<char,std::char_traits<char>>(std::basic_ostream<_Elem,_Traits> &,const char *)' 1> with 1> [ 1> _Elem=char, 1> _Traits=std::char_traits<char> 1> ] – Mike Nov 28 '10 at 13:11
1  
This means you need to implement a function with this signature: std::ostream& operator <<(const std::ostream&, const Rational&); (that's what the error message is saying, albeit in a way which is harder to read--you might consider a program like stlfilt to help with that). – John Zwinck Nov 28 '10 at 13:16
    
Ok. Thank you John, I am working on it. – Mike Nov 28 '10 at 13:58
1  
Works like a charm! friend ostream &operator<<(ostream &os, const Rational &r) { os << r.numerator << "/" << r.denominator; return os; } – Mike Nov 28 '10 at 14:18

On this line:

cout << &Term::coefficient << " x^"  << &Term::exponent << endl;

you're printing out the ADDRESS of Term::coefficient and Term::exponent (that's what the unary & operator is in this context).

Try removing the &s and re-compile/run.

share|improve this answer
1  
The coefficient (Rational object) does not have a string conversion method either. So it will be partially garbage. – whatnick Nov 28 '10 at 13:07
    
One problem - Term::coefficient (why not just coefficient?) doesn't appear to be supported by an operator<< overload. Also, the &Term::coefficient is probably getting a member-pointer rather than a normal pointer (I could be confused), but it still doesn't explain a value of 1 for coefficient unless I'm really confused. Is there a precedence issue (I habitually wrap most expressions in parens when doing stream I/O). – Steve314 Nov 28 '10 at 13:12

There are several things that seem odd do me:

  1. There is no need to pass ints by const reference. An int is small enough to be passed by value without an impact on performance. Passing by const reference is useful for big objects.

  2. As others have said, you are printing out the adresses of the member variables instead of their values.

  3. You don't need the member variables a and b.

  4. The if-statements in the Rational constructor only apply to the first assignment, while your indentation suggests it should apply to both. Use { ... } for multiple statements, C++ won't care about your indentation.

  5. If the assignment in the Rational constructor doesn't run, numerator and denominator are unassigned and will have an undefined value. Use an initialization list, to set a default value.

  6. You should consider overloading operator<< for Term and Rational instead of writing a print method. This will also allow for cout << coefficient to work as expected.

  7. Thanks to Steve314 for pointing this out: leading underscores in identifiers are reserved and shouldn't be used, to avoid name clashes. So you shouldn't “#define _TERM_H”. See Steves comment for details.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks everybody! I added the {} in with my if then statement as well. The problem was that I needed to overload the '<<' operator and make the Term.print statement just read :cout << coefficient << " x^" << exponent << endl; Thanks everybody!!!!!! – Mike Nov 28 '10 at 14:20
    
Could you add (WRT include guards) that leading (and double) underscores are reserved for all identifiers - trailing underscores are OK. Odds of causing a problem are generally low, but it's best to develop good habits. Best guess - the leading underscores pattern is probably learned by copying standard library headers, which are allowed to use it. I mistakenly used it myself at one point - maybe for this reason, but that's lost in time. – Steve314 Nov 28 '10 at 16:22
    
@Steve314 Good point. I added it to the list. – ollb Nov 28 '10 at 18:54

The basic issue is here: &Term::coefficient << " x^" << &Term::exponent You need to reference the instance of class Term. The Rational object also needs a string conversion method.

share|improve this answer
    
The instance in this case is the implicit this, and in some cases it is valid to disambiguate a member of this with :: - e.g. specifying the base class the member was inherited from. Though I do think the :: is a problem here. – Steve314 Nov 28 '10 at 16:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.