Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here's the code that won't work :

class MyClass
{
    const myconst = 'somevalue';

    private $myvar = array( 0 => 'do something with '.self::myconst );
}

Seems that class constants are not available at "compile time", but only at runtime. Does anyone know any workaround ? (define won't work)

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
if you're looking for something like a C macro, PHP doesn't work that way. besides, there's no "compile time". PHP is an interpreter. –  stillstanding Nov 28 '10 at 14:37
    
The people who wrote the manual seem to be under the impression that there is a "compile time". php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.properties.php –  Alin Purcaru Nov 28 '10 at 14:50
    
There is a "compile time" (sort of), since PHP internals convert text code to bytecode. See sebastian-bergmann.de/archives/868-PHP-Compiler-Internals.html –  Antoine Nov 28 '10 at 14:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The problem in your class declaration is not that you are using a constant, but that you are using an expression.

Class member variables are called "properties". (...) They are defined by using one of the keywords public, protected, or private, followed by a normal variable declaration. This declaration may include an initialization, but this initialization must be a constant value--that is, it must be able to be evaluated at compile time and must not depend on run-time information in order to be evaluated.

This simple declaration, for example, will not compile (parse error):

class MyClass{
    private $myvar = 3+2;
}

But if we alter your class declaration to use the simple constant, rather than a string concatenated with that constant it will work as expected.

class MyClass{
    const myconst = 'somevalue';
    public $myvar = array( 0 => self::myconst );
}

$obj = new MyClass();
echo $obj->myvar[0];

As a work-around you could initialize your properties in the constructor:

class MyClass{
    const myconst = 'somevalue';
    public $myvar;

    public function __construct(){
        $this->myvar = array( 0 => 'do something with '.self::myconst );
    }
}
$obj = new MyClass();
echo $obj->myvar[0];

I hope this helps you,
Alin

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I knew that... I first tried to "const" my array, but PHP does not allow it. And it seems that the basic "define" (the real one, the #define from C/C++) does not exists in PHP. So, anyone has a workaround ? –  Antoine Nov 28 '10 at 14:47
    
@Antoine See the latest edit. This is all I could think of and I would say that it's an acceptable method to initialize in the constructor. –  Alin Purcaru Nov 28 '10 at 14:56
    
Thanks, that's a good way to solve my problem ! –  Antoine Nov 29 '10 at 14:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.