Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having trouble getting my head around interfaces. After trawling through similar questions on here, I've come up with the following interface, for defining the CRUD operations required for all my classes:

public interface IData<T>
{
    IData<T> Select(int id);
    List<T> SelectMultiple();
    void Insert();
    void Update();
    void Delete();
}

This is then implemented within my partial classes:

public partial class Post : IData<Post>
{
    public IData<Post> Select(int id)
    {
        MyDataContext dc = MyDataContext.Create();
        return dc.Posts.Single(p => p.PostID == id);
    }

    public List<Post> SelectMultiple()
    {
        MyDataContext dc = MyDataContext.Create();
        return dc.Posts.ToList();
    }

    // Update() and Delete() declarations
}

This all compiles fine, however if I try to use the Post Select() method:

Post p = new Post().Select(1);

It fails with Cannot implicitly convert type 'IData' to 'Post'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?)

Which makes sense, but how do I have it so that it doesn't require a Cast? I want the Select to return a Post (but not define Post as the return type at the interface level). Have I misunderstood interfaces, or is there a quick alteration I can make?

share|improve this question
    
It seems your Post is mixing concerns; it performs CRUD and also holds a post. I would split it into two classes, e.g. Post and PostStorage. –  strager Nov 28 '10 at 16:31
    
The Posts are stored within SQL Server and are accessed via LinqToSQL DBML. The Post class above is a partial class of the Post within the DBML. –  Lazlow Nov 28 '10 at 16:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You want to return something of type T, not IData<T>, so just change the signature (at least I guess this is what you want, as you'd return List<IData<T>> otherwise):

public interface IData<T>
{
  T Select(int id);
  List<T> SelectMultiple();
  void Insert();
  void Update();
  void Delete();
}

and implement it appropiately:

public Post Select(int id)
{
    MyDataContext dc = MyDataContext.Create();
    return dc.Posts.Single(p => p.PostID == id);
}

If you just want this behaviour in the Post class, explicitly implement the IData<T> interface:

public partial class Post : IData<Post>
{
  public Post Select(int id)
  {
      MyDataContext dc = MyDataContext.Create();
      return dc.Posts.Single(p => p.PostID == id);
  }

  IData<Post> IData<Post>.Select(int id)
  {
      return Select(id);
  }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect, thanks - that works. –  Lazlow Nov 28 '10 at 16:37

You need to change the methods to return Post instances, then add explicit interface implementations that return the interface.

For example:

public partial class Post : IData<Post> {
    Post Select(int id) { ... }
    IData<Post> IData<Post>.Select(int id) { return Select(id); }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That works, but it seems odd creating one method to satisfy the Interface and another for in real-world usage. –  Lazlow Nov 28 '10 at 16:36
2  
@Lazlow, It is done more often than you may think. It's very common when implementing IEnumerable<T>, for example; IEnumerable GetEnumerator() simply calls IEnumerable<T> GetEnumerator(). –  strager Nov 28 '10 at 16:37

You should explicitly implement IData<Post>.Select and provide your own Select with the appropriate return value. For example:

IData<Post> IData<Post>.Select(int id)
{
    return Select(id);
}

Post Select(int id)
{
    MyDataContext dc = MyDataContext.Create();
    return dc.Posts.Single(p => p.PostID == id);
}

However, if you do this:

IData<Post> post = new Post();
Post p = post.Select(1);

post.Select(1) still returns IData<Post>. See Femaref's answer on a refactoring of the interface to allow this.

share|improve this answer

What about trying

public Post Select(int id)
{
    MyDataContext dc = MyDataContext.Create();
    return dc.Posts.Single(p => p.PostID == id);
}

i.e., return directly Post instead of IData<Post>.

share|improve this answer
    
Then the interface isn't implemented. –  strager Nov 28 '10 at 16:28
    
Yup, of course you 'd need to refactor that too. Actually the answer of SLaks above is the same idea, but properly developed. –  Jon Nov 28 '10 at 16:30
    
That's where I started, but it wouldn't compile as the signature didn't match that of the Interface. –  Lazlow Nov 28 '10 at 16:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.