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I'm trying to get a simple jQuery get JSON call to work. Neither my success handler non error handler seems to be getting called. Firebug also shows the data body as empty.

The server is a very basic bit of code running under web.py. I've tested the server by connecting to it with lynx and it downloads the json data OK.

Here's the jQuery:


$(document).ready(function() {
    $.ajax({
        url: 'http://localhost:8080/settings.json',
        cache: false,
        success: function(json){
            alert('json success ' + json);
        },
        error: function(xhr, textStatus, errorThrown) {
            alert(xhr.statusText);
        }
    });
});

JSON data is:
{"netmask": "255.255.0.0", "ipaddress": "192.168.1.153"}

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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can't make a request to another domain (that rule includes a different port) with an XmlHttpRequest, this is blocked by the same origin policy.

The result of trying to do this is an empty response, so you can't see the content. This is just a rule in place for security purposes...if you're connecting to the same host and port, it's a non-issue.

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you can't be sure that the OP is making a cross-domain call. and also, a cross-domain call usually throws up an exception. –  anirvan Nov 28 '10 at 17:46
    
@fred: So for instance, if you're testing this by opening the HTML file directly from a file browser (so you end up with a URL in your address bar starting with file://), that's a different origin than your http://localhost:8080 path. If you are loading the HTML file via a URL starting with http://localhost:8080 then this isn't an origin problem, it's something else. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 28 '10 at 17:46
    
@anirvan - it doesn't throw an exception, it depends on the browser as to what it does...what I can see is a port in the URL and this tale-tale symptom: "Firebug also shows the data body as empty"...that's exactly what happens when you make the request this way (cross-domain), and it works fine otherwise... exactly like the OP is experiencing :) –  Nick Craver Nov 28 '10 at 17:48
    
Thanks guys, actually I am connecting to the same server but a different port. I'm serving the file with the javascript with apache on port 80 and my REST server is running on 8080. Is there any simple way to get the request to the different port to work? –  fred basset Nov 28 '10 at 17:50
1  
@fred: If you're in control of both ends (and it sounds like you are), you can use CORS on a browser that supports it. Otherwise, you're looking at JSONP or (for public-facing stuff) a YQL proxy. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 28 '10 at 17:52
show 11 more comments

You can set up a reverse proxy in Apache that will make a remote data source look like it's coming from a local domain. I've written a blog post about how to do this:

http://senchabits.wordpress.com/2012/09/17/problem-accessing-json-data-from-a-local-data-source-is-not-permitted/

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I've found a workaround to get an error callback with an empty response in cross domain requests.

In this example I'm using Zepto, a light-weight version of jQuery, but I assume that this works fine in jQuery too.

First of all, you must use these parameters to do a cross domain request:

$.ajax({
    url: url,
    type: 'GET',
    dataType: 'jsonp',
    contentType: 'application/x-javascript',
    crossDomain: true,
    success: function (data, status) { /* ... */ }
    error: function () { /* ... */ }
    // ...

Now, the $.ajax function internally use the $.ajaxJSONP for crossdomain requests. This is the original Zepto $.ajaxJSONP function:

  $.ajaxJSONP = function(options){
    var callbackName = 'jsonp' + (++jsonpID),
      script = document.createElement('script'),
      abort = function(){
        $(script).remove()
        if (callbackName in window) window[callbackName] = empty
        ajaxComplete('abort', xhr, options)
      },
      xhr = { abort: abort }, abortTimeout

    if (options.error) script.onerror = function() {
      xhr.abort()
      options.error()
    }

    window[callbackName] = function(data){
      clearTimeout(abortTimeout)
      $(script).remove()
      delete window[callbackName]
      ajaxSuccess(data, xhr, options)
    }

    serializeData(options)
    script.src = options.url.replace(/=\?/, '=' + callbackName)
    $('head').append(script)

    if (options.timeout > 0) abortTimeout = setTimeout(function(){
        xhr.abort()
        ajaxComplete('timeout', xhr, options)
      }, options.timeout)

    return xhr
  }

My workaround is very simple and consists on an interval called few times on the script.onload event handler, in order to verify that the callback function was called.

This is my version of the $.ajaxJSONP function:

$.ajaxJSONP = function(options){
    var called = false, // Flag to check that callback was called
        callbackName = 'jsonp' + (++jsonpID),
        script = document.createElement('script'),
        abort = function(){
            $(script).remove()
            if (callbackName in window) window[callbackName] = empty
            ajaxComplete('abort', xhr, options)
        },
        xhr = { abort: abort }, abortTimeout

    if (options.error) {
        script.onerror = function() {
            xhr.abort()
            options.error()
        };

        // IMPORTANT!!!
        script.onload = function () {
            var times = 0;

            var interval = setInterval(function () {
                // After 5 intervals, if the callback wasn't called, returns an error
                if (times++ == 5) {
                    clearInterval(interval);

                    if (!called) {
                        options.error();
                    }
                } else if (called) {
                    clearInterval(interval);
                }
            }, 100);
        };
    }

    window[callbackName] = function(data){
        // Setting the "called" flag to true
        called = true;
        clearTimeout(abortTimeout)
        $(script).remove()
        delete window[callbackName]
        ajaxSuccess(data, xhr, options)
    }

    serializeData(options)
    script.src = options.url.replace(/=\?/, '=' + callbackName)
    $('head').append(script)

    if (options.timeout > 0) abortTimeout = setTimeout(function(){
        xhr.abort()
        ajaxComplete('timeout', xhr, options)
    }, options.timeout)

    return xhr
}

Note: If you are interested in the server side behavior, please see the beginning of this tutorial: http://phonegap.com/2011/07/20/making-jsonp-calls-with-zepto-on-android-device/

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