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Dear stackoverflow friends,

I was hoping you could help me with the following: i am learning the basics of reading from txt files. I have code that works fine if everything is in the main method. However, for this exercise i am asked to put the open and close methods into separate methods. The open method takes one argument (the filename), the close method takes no arguments.

I am a bit lost i have to say. Could you help me by pointing me in the right direction? The open method works fine. The close method is my problem.

import java.io.*;
class  EmpInFile
{
    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        EmpInFile myFile = new EmpInFile() ;
        myFile.openFile("payslip.txt") ;
        myFile.closeFile() ; 
    } // end main

public void openFile(String filename) throws IOException {
    String line ;
    int numLines ;
    // open input file
    FileReader reader = new FileReader(filename) ;
    BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(reader) ;
    numLines = 0 ;
    // read each line from the file
    line = in.readLine() ; // read first
    while (line != null)
    {
        numLines++ ;
        System.out.println(line) ; // print current
        line = in.readLine() ; // read next line
    }
    System.out.println(numLines + "lines read from file") ;
} // end openFile

public void closeFile() throws IOException {
    in.close() ;
    System.out.println("file closed") ;
    } // end closeFile
} // end class

thanks

Baba

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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To have openFile and closeFile share some data, you need to put that data as a field in the class.

import java.io.*;
class  EmpInFile
{
   // shared data here.
   BufferedReader in;

   public void openFile() {
     ... set something in "in"
   }

   public void closeFile() {
     ... close "in"
   }
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He does have something set in the open method - it's a local variable, no need to pass it in. –  duffymo Nov 28 '10 at 18:54
    
Hi Martin, thank you very much. it's working fine now! thanks again for your help! –  raoulbia Nov 28 '10 at 19:02
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I think this is bad design. Your openFile() method is doing much more than that - it's reading the complete contents and echoing them to the console (useless, but that's what you're doing).

I don't see what value your close() method is providing. You'd better pass in a File to close. What have you done when you simply wrap the method from java.io.File? At least handle the exception so users don't have to.

I would not recommend using class variables. You can write three methods that are static that will be a lot more useful:

package utils;

public class FileUtils
{
    public static Reader openFile(String fileName) throws IOException
    {
        return new FileReader(new File(fileName)); 
    }

    public static List<String> readFile(String fileName) throws IOException
    {
        List<String> contents = new ArrayList<String>();

        BufferedReader br = null;

        try
        {
            br = new BufferedReader(openFile(fileName));
            while ((String line = br.readLine()) != null)
            {
                contents.add(line);
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            close(br);
        }


        return contents;
    }

    public static void close(Reader r)
    {
        try 
        {
            if (r != null)
            {
                r.close();
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
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Although I agree completely, I believe your answer is of little value to a beginner. Too cryptic for someone not into the topic. –  Grzegorz Oledzki Nov 28 '10 at 18:56
    
Added code - how's that? –  duffymo Nov 28 '10 at 19:01
    
IMHO definitely better. –  Grzegorz Oledzki Nov 28 '10 at 19:08
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You need to make in a class-level field.

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You should know how to do this from class. –  SLaks Nov 28 '10 at 18:43
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Your file pointer is not visible in the close method. To have the open and close methods, your FileReader needs to be a member variable.

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I just want to add something here. It is not an answet but a useful information for you. You do not need to close both BuffuredReader and FileReader. Closing either one of BufferedReader is enough. Previous question was answered here

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