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I'm experimenting ideas around using AppDomain to manage some legacy code contains lots of static fields in a multi-threaded environment.

I read answers this question: How to use an AppDomain to limit a static class' scope for thread-safe use?, thought it's quite promising and decided to try it out with a very simple class in assembly ClassLibrary1.dll:

namespace ClassLibrary1
{
    public static class Class1
    {
        private static int Value = 0;

        public static void IncrementAndPrint()
        {
            Console.WriteLine(Value++);
        }
    }
}

and here's my code that loads the assemblyinto 2 different app domains and invokes the IncrementAndPrint() several times:

var appDomain1 = System.AppDomain.CreateDomain("AppDomain1");
var appDomain2 = System.AppDomain.CreateDomain("AppDomain2");

var assemblyInAppDomain1 = appDomain1.Load("ClassLibrary1");
var assemblyInAppDomain2 = appDomain2.Load("ClassLibrary1");

var class1InAppDomain1 = assemblyInAppDomain1.GetType("ClassLibrary1.Class1");
var class1InAppDomain2 = assemblyInAppDomain2.GetType("ClassLibrary1.Class1");

class1InAppDomain1.InvokeMember("IncrementAndPrint", BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, null, null, null);
class1InAppDomain1.InvokeMember("IncrementAndPrint", BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, null, null, null);
class1InAppDomain1.InvokeMember("IncrementAndPrint", BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, null, null, null);

class1InAppDomain2.InvokeMember("IncrementAndPrint", BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, null, null, null);
class1InAppDomain2.InvokeMember("IncrementAndPrint", BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, null, null, null);
class1InAppDomain2.InvokeMember("IncrementAndPrint", BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, null, null, null);

I was expecting the output to be:

0
1
2
0
1
2

because there will be a copy of the static field Value to local to each instance of AppDomain. However, instead what I got was:

0
1
2
3
4
5

which tells me they are still all sharing the same copy of the static field Value. Can anyone tell me what have I done wrong here?

Update:

I tried Erik's suggestion, now I call CreateInstanceAndUnwrap() method of the AppDomain class instead of calling Load() and GetType() as shown below. Also, I've converted IncrementAndPrint to an instance method rather than a static method. However, I'm still getting the same result.

var appDomain1 = System.AppDomain.CreateDomain("AppDomain1");
var appDomain2 = System.AppDomain.CreateDomain("AppDomain2");

var class1InAppDomain1 = (Class1)appDomain1.CreateInstanceAndUnwrap("ClassLibrary1", "ClassLibrary1.Class1");
var class1InAppDomain2 = (Class1)appDomain2.CreateInstanceAndUnwrap("ClassLibrary1", "ClassLibrary1.Class1");

class1InAppDomain1.IncrementAndPrint();
class1InAppDomain1.IncrementAndPrint();
class1InAppDomain1.IncrementAndPrint();

class1InAppDomain2.IncrementAndPrint();
class1InAppDomain2.IncrementAndPrint();
class1InAppDomain2.IncrementAndPrint();
share|improve this question
    
You're calling the static method in the Current app domain. You need to create an Instance method that calls the Static method on the Class1 class. –  Erik Philips Nov 28 '10 at 21:39
1  
Hi Erik, if you have a look at my updated source code, I have converted IncrementAndPrint() to an instance method and use CreateInstanceAndUnWrap() to create instances in respective app domains. However, I'm still getting the same result –  oscarkuo Nov 29 '10 at 0:23
    
I completely forgot to mention the MarhsalByRefObject on your appDomain Model. –  Erik Philips Nov 29 '10 at 1:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 16 down vote accepted

It looks like you are loading a type from another appDomain into the current appDomain. Thus the code that calls the static methods are calling from the current appDomain.

I'm unaware of any other way to call a static method in another domain without creating an instance of an object in another domain, and having that object call the static method.

Example: Solution contains 2 Projects (ClassLibrary and a Winforms/Console app)

[ClassLibrary]

using System;

namespace MyLibrary
{
    public class DomainObject : MarshalByRefObject
    {
        private static int _Value;

        private static void IncrementValue()
        {
            DomainObject._Value++;
        }

        public static int Value
        {
            get
            {
                return DomainObject._Value;
            }
        }

        public int GetIncrementedValue()
        {
            DomainObject.IncrementValue();
            return DomainObject.Value;
        }
    }
}

[Application]

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    AppDomain domain1 = AppDomain.CreateDomain("domain1");
    AppDomain domain2 = AppDomain.CreateDomain("domain2");

    DomainObject object1 = 
        domain1.CreateInstanceAndUnwrap("MyLibrary", "MyLibrary.DomainObject") 
        as DomainObject;

    DomainObject object2 = 
        domain2.CreateInstanceAndUnwrap("MyLibrary", "MyLibrary.DomainObject") 
        as DomainObject;

    if (object1 != null)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("object 1 Value = " 
                          + object1.GetIncrementedValue().ToString());
        Console.WriteLine("object 1 Value = " 
                          + object1.GetIncrementedValue().ToString());
        Console.WriteLine("object 1 Value = " 
                          + object1.GetIncrementedValue().ToString());
    }
    if (object2 != null)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("object 2 Value = "
                          + object2.GetIncrementedValue().ToString());
        Console.WriteLine("object 2 Value = "
                          + object2.GetIncrementedValue().ToString());
        Console.WriteLine("object 2 Value = "
                          + object2.GetIncrementedValue().ToString());
    }

    /* Unload the Domain and re-create
     * This should reset the Static Value in the AppDomain
     */
    AppDomain.Unload(domain1);
    domain1 = AppDomain.CreateDomain("domain1");
    object1 = domain1.CreateInstanceAndUnwrap("MyLibrary", 
                                              "MyLibrary.DomainObject") 
                                              as DomainObject;

    if (object1 != null)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("object 1 Value = "
                          + object1.GetIncrementedValue().ToString());
        Console.WriteLine("object 1 Value = "
                          + object1.GetIncrementedValue().ToString());
        Console.WriteLine("object 1 Value = "
                          + object1.GetIncrementedValue().ToString());
    }
    if (object2 != null)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("object 2 Value = "
                          + object2.GetIncrementedValue().ToString());
        Console.WriteLine("object 2 Value = "
                          + object2.GetIncrementedValue().ToString());
        Console.WriteLine("object 2 Value = "
                          + object2.GetIncrementedValue().ToString());
    }
}

Generated Results:

object 1 Value = 1
object 1 Value = 2
object 1 Value = 3
object 2 Value = 1
object 2 Value = 2
object 2 Value = 3
object 1 Value = 1
object 1 Value = 2
object 1 Value = 3
object 2 Value = 4
object 2 Value = 5
object 2 Value = 6
share|improve this answer
3  
cheers mate, MarhsalByRefObject does the trick. –  oscarkuo Nov 29 '10 at 20:03
1  
Additionally, with the original release of .NET there was a lesser known bug where executing a static method in the current domain that then called non-static methods on the defining type (created in a separate domain) would result in non-static code executing in the current domain (even though the defining type was MBR). The solution was to not call static methods on types that were also MBRs. At the time we believed this was a problem with JIT optimizations believing MBR calls could be inlined because of the use of a static method defined on the MBR. –  Shaun Wilson Apr 6 '13 at 20:25

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