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What is an efficient way of generating N unique numbers within a given range using C#? For example, generate 6 unique numbers between 1 and 50. A lazy way would be to simply use Random.Next() in a loop and store that number in an array/list, then repeat and check if it already exists or not etc.. Is there a better way to generate a group of random, but unique, numbers? To add more context, I would like to select N random items from a collection, using their index.

thanks

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2  
Talk about a well-hashed and pre-solved problem... Is Google broken already? Hmmm... In other news, you've also stated what is pretty well the least complex version of the problem. –  jcolebrand Nov 28 '10 at 21:21
    
possible duplicate of Five unique, random numbers from a subset –  Tim Stone Nov 28 '10 at 21:29
1  
@drachenstern: Bit touchy today aren't we? @Tim - Sorry, I didn't search for 'subset' keyword and ended up with results for why random number generation is hard. Thanks for the link. –  Skoder Nov 28 '10 at 21:34
    
~ I don't think so. I think this problem is well solved. Somebody else apparently agrees with me. –  jcolebrand Nov 28 '10 at 21:41
1  
@drachenstern - Nothing to do with what you were saying. Just wondering if sarcasm was really required. –  Skoder Nov 28 '10 at 21:43

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Take an array of 50 elemwnts: {1, 2, 3, .... 50} Shuffle the array using any of the standard algorithms of randomly shuffling arrays. The first six elements of the modified array is what you are looking for. HTH

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2  
if you want 2 unique number from 1 to 10^32 !!! ?? so what? –  user415789 Nov 28 '10 at 21:28
    
Thanks, I like this method. Will accept in 5 mins. –  Skoder Nov 28 '10 at 21:30
    
@HPT: Naturally in that case it is better to keep a set of already had numbers. But in this case, when the numbers are small, I believe my solution is not bad at all –  Armen Tsirunyan Nov 28 '10 at 21:32
1  
@armen: Correct solution is something and good solution is another thing. you can write a random generator as question mentioned for this problem too! but that could not be the solution. –  user415789 Nov 28 '10 at 21:39
    
@HPT: At least my solution has predictable runtime –  Armen Tsirunyan Nov 28 '10 at 21:41

For 6-from-50, I'm not too sure I'd worry about efficiency since the chance of a duplicate is relatively low (30% overall, from my back-of-the-envelope calculations). You could quite easily just remember the previous numbers you'd generated and throw them away, something like (pseudo-code):

n[0] = rnd(50)
for each i in 1..5:
    n[i] = n[0]
while n[1] == n[0]:
    n[1] = rnd(50)
while n[2] == any of (n[0], n[1]):
    n[2] = rnd(50)
while n[3] == any of (n[0], n[1], n[2]):
    n[3] = rnd(50)
while n[4] == any of (n[0], n[1], n[2], n[3]):
    n[4] = rnd(50)
while n[5] == any of (n[0], n[1], n[2], n[3], n[4]):
    n[5] = rnd(50)

However, this will break down as you move from 6-from-50 to 48-from-50, or 6-from-6, since the duplicates start getting far more probable. That's because the pool of available numbers gets smaller and you end up throwing away more and more.

For a very efficient solution that gives you a subset of your values with zero possibility of duplicates (and no unnecessary up-front sorting), Fisher-Yates is the way to go.

dim n[50]                 // gives n[0] through n[9]
for each i in 0..49:
    n[i] = i              // initialise them to their indexes
nsize = 50                // starting pool size
do 6 times:
    i = rnd(nsize)        // give a number between 0 and nsize-1
    print n[i]
    nsize = nsize - 1     // these two lines effectively remove the used number
    n[i] = n[nsize]

By simply selecting a random number from the pool, replacing it with the top number from that pool, then reducing the size of the pool, you get a shuffle without having to worry about a large number of swaps up front.

This is important if the number is high in that it doesn't introduce an unnecessary startup delay.

For example, examine the following bench-check, choosing 10-from-10:

<------ n[] ------>
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9  nsize  rnd(nsize)  output
-------------------  -----  ----------  ------
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9     10           4       4
0 1 2 3 9 5 6 7 8        9           7       7
0 1 2 3 9 5 6 8          8           2       2
0 1 8 3 9 5 6            7           6       6
0 1 8 3 9 5              6           0       0
5 1 8 3 9                5           2       8
5 1 9 3                  4           1       1
5 3 9                    3           0       5
9 3                      2           1       3
9                        1           0       9

You can see the pool reducing as you go and, because you're always replacing the used one with an unused one, you'll never have a repeat.

Using the results returned from that as indexes into your collection will guarantee that no duplicate items will be selected.

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This is the best solution, an improved version of mine. –  Erik Philips Nov 29 '10 at 1:12

For large sets of unique numbers, put them in an List..

        Random random = new Random();
        List<int> uniqueInts = new List<int>(10000);
        List<int> ranInts = new List<int>(500);
        for (int i = 1; i < 10000; i++) { uniqueInts.Add(i); }

        for (int i = 1; i < 500; i++)
        {
            int index = random.Next(uniqueInts.Count) + 1;
            ranInts.Add(uniqueInts[index]);
            uniqueInts.RemoveAt(index);
        }

Then randomly generate a number from 1 to myInts.Count. Store the myInt value and remove it from the List. No need to shuffle the list nor look to see if the value already exists.

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this does nit guarantee the uniqueness of random numbers –  user415789 Nov 28 '10 at 21:29
2  
Removing the number from the List (whatever IEnumerable you want to use) makes it unique, you can't get it from the list if it doesn't exist... Again this is faster for LARGE sets of unique numbers, because you are not looking for a number that may or may not exist. –  Erik Philips Nov 28 '10 at 21:34
1  
works great for me. Just one minor bug: it should be uniqueInts.RemoveAt(index); instead of uniqueInts.Remove(index); –  AyKarsi Nov 11 '11 at 10:07
    
@AyKarsi, That is an extremely important note, thanks! (Updated) –  Erik Philips Nov 11 '11 at 18:23

instead of using List use Dictionary!!

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also you should check to add N successful add, It's obvious how to check whether you have added a new value to dictionary or not! –  user415789 Nov 28 '10 at 21:31
    
Thanks for the tip. I guess dictionaries would be better for larger sets. –  Skoder Nov 28 '10 at 21:32
var random = new Random();
var intArray = Enumerable.Range(0, 4).OrderBy(t => random.Next()).ToArray();

This array will contain 5 random numbers from 0 to 4.

or

  var intArray = Enumerable.Range(0, 10).OrderBy(t => random.Next()).Take(5).ToArray();

This array will contain 5 random numbers between 0 to 10.

int firstNumber = intArray[0];
int secondNumber = intArray[1];
int thirdNumber = intArray[2];
int fourthNumber = intArray[3];
int fifthNumber = intArray[4];
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generate unique random nos from 1 to 40 :

output confirmed :

class Program

{
    static int[] a = new int[40];
    static Random r = new Random();
    static bool b;
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int t;
        for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++)
        {
        lab:  t = r.Next(1, 40);
            for(int j=0;j<20;j++)
            {

                if (a[j] == t)
                {
                    goto lab;
                }
            }

            a[i] = t;
            Console.WriteLine(a[i]);



        }
        Console.Read();
    }


}

sample output :

7 38 14 18 13 29 28 26 22 8 24 19 35 39 33 32 20 2 15 37

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5  
Dreadfully inefficient solution... especially when there have been much better answers already presented. You also got unused properties and you used Goto!!! Why? –  bPratik Oct 14 '12 at 19:41

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