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I've been looking at refactoring my login controller for better code readability. In doing so, I came across the Programmatic OpenID Relying Party example that looks like this

using DotNetOpenAuth.Messaging;

public ActionResult LogOn()
{
    var openid = new OpenIdRelyingParty();
    IAuthenticationResponse response = openid.GetResponse();

    if (response != null)
    {
        switch (response.Status)
        {
            case AuthenticationStatus.Authenticated:
                FormsAuthentication.RedirectFromLoginPage(
                    response.ClaimedIdentifier, false);
                break;
            case AuthenticationStatus.Canceled:
                ModelState.AddModelError("loginIdentifier",
                    "Login was cancelled at the provider");
                break;
            case AuthenticationStatus.Failed:
                ModelState.AddModelError("loginIdentifier",
                    "Login failed using the provided OpenID identifier");
                break;
        }
    }           

    return View();
}

[System.Web.Mvc.AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Post)]
public ActionResult LogOn(string loginIdentifier)
{
    if (!Identifier.IsValid(loginIdentifier))
    {
        ModelState.AddModelError("loginIdentifier",
                    "The specified login identifier is invalid");
        return View();
    }
    else
    {
        var openid = new OpenIdRelyingParty();
        IAuthenticationRequest request = openid.CreateRequest(
            Identifier.Parse(loginIdentifier));

        // Require some additional data
        request.AddExtension(new ClaimsRequest
        {
            BirthDate = DemandLevel.NoRequest,
            Email = DemandLevel.Require,
            FullName = DemandLevel.Require
        });

        return request.RedirectingResponse.AsActionResult();
    }
}

Now this looks heaps cleaner and easier to read than what I used from the downloadable examples. (I downloaded the most recent version and this is the example they give - which is the same example I built my app on 5 months ago.)

    [ValidateInput(false)]
    public ActionResult Authenticate(string returnUrl) {
        var response = openid.GetResponse();
        if (response == null) {
            // Stage 2: user submitting Identifier
            Identifier id;
            if (Identifier.TryParse(Request.Form["openid_identifier"], out id)) {
                try {
                    return openid.CreateRequest(Request.Form["openid_identifier"]).RedirectingResponse.AsActionResult();
                } catch (ProtocolException ex) {
                    ViewData["Message"] = ex.Message;
                    return View("Login");
                }
            } else {
                ViewData["Message"] = "Invalid identifier";
                return View("Login");
            }
        } else {
            // Stage 3: OpenID Provider sending assertion response
            switch (response.Status) {
                case AuthenticationStatus.Authenticated:
                    Session["FriendlyIdentifier"] = response.FriendlyIdentifierForDisplay;
                    FormsAuthentication.SetAuthCookie(response.ClaimedIdentifier, false);
                    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(returnUrl)) {
                        return Redirect(returnUrl);
                    } else {
                        return RedirectToAction("Index", "Home");
                    }
                case AuthenticationStatus.Canceled:
                    ViewData["Message"] = "Canceled at provider";
                    return View("Login");
                case AuthenticationStatus.Failed:
                    ViewData["Message"] = response.Exception.Message;
                    return View("Login");
            }
        }
        return new EmptyResult();
    }

Now that example has too many if statements for my liking, and with the extra processing that I have to add in (activity logging and checking for new user or add to existing account), it starts getting really messy really quick.

Unfortunately, if I were to refactor my code to look more like the first example, I'm stuck on one small problem. How does the View interact with this? I mean, it's looking for openid.GetResponse(), but how do I submit that response?

Like I said, if I can get this working, it looks as though it'll be a lot cleaner than my current way.

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How did you get the last line to work? return request.RedirectingResponse.AsActionResult(); I've added a number of namespace usings in however I can't work out how to progress this part. HttpRequestBase doesn't contain a reference for RedirectingResponse. –  zeristor Jun 28 '13 at 10:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't submit this response. The OpenID provider does when you click approve or cancel on their approval page. As far as I understand what's going on here is that for example Google returns a bunch of data via GET and then DotNetOpenAuth parses when you call openid.GetResponse().

I've published a heavily commented basic OpenID for MVC implementation that also features user registration. You can find it at http://mvcopenid.codeplex.com. It's still not as clean as the upper sample, but I find it quite clean. I will refactor that eventually, but I'll need to figure out how to get around MVC's model binder nicely, because I don't like code like Request.Form["openid_identifier"].

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1  
Hey that looks really cool. I'm gonna check it out! –  Chase Florell Nov 29 '10 at 15:53
    
Do you know if we can also get the "provider name" at the same time? In my app you can have unlimited associated OpenID's, so I'd like to refer to which provider each login is associated with. –  Chase Florell Nov 29 '10 at 15:54
    
Do you mean a pretty name for a provider? I haven't tried that yet, but I don't think it's possible with SimpleRegistration. I think most clients use some list for pretty names. But as I said I haven't dug that deep down yet. –  gligoran Nov 29 '10 at 19:12
    
Sorry, but at the moment I cannot find anything to get the provider's name. It would probably be a good idea to just take the domain name. –  gligoran Nov 30 '10 at 10:05
    
great thanks... –  Chase Florell Dec 2 '10 at 4:10

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