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I got surprised when I debugged my code. Here I provide example code

#include<QMessageBox>
#include<iostream>
#include<math.h>
#include<QApplication>
using namespace std;

class MyMessageBox: public QMessageBox
{
    public:
        MyMessageBox(string message,QWidget *parent=0) :
            QMessageBox(
                QMessageBox::NoIcon,
                QString("ErrorMessage"),
                QString(message.c_str()),
                QMessageBox::Ok,
                parent,
                Qt::Widget)
        {
        }
};

void Hai()
{
    int tempi = 4;
    double a = pow(10,tempi);
    int temp = int(pow(10,tempi));

    //int temp=a;

    MyMessageBox mb1((QString::number(pow(10,tempi))+
                      " *** "+
                      QString::number(temp)).toStdString());
    mb1.exec();
}

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{

    QApplication app(argc,argv);
    Hai();

    return app.exec();
}

and the result is,

10000 *** 9999

And the main point is, this thing happens only for power 4 (=pow(x,4), not for any other powers.

EDIT:

I tried a minimal code with Visual Studio, but it yields 10,000 exactly. But, it never compiled until I made the type conversion explicitly. The code is given below

#include<iostream>
#include<math.h>

using namespace std;

void Hai()
{
    int tempi = 4;
    double a=pow(10.0,tempi);
    int temp=pow(10.0,tempi);

    cout << " a " << a << " temp " << temp << endl ;
}

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    Hai();
    return 1;
}
share|improve this question
    
Please try to give minimal examples. Your example contains a bunch of QT cruft that has nothing to do with anything -- a 10-line program using printf() would show the problem just as well. –  j_random_hacker Nov 29 '10 at 6:51
1  
@j_random_hacker Please see the edit –  prabhakaran Nov 29 '10 at 7:35
    
Are you using the same compiler and platform for both examples? If so then it is QT-dependent after all! (And if not then I would suggest doing so to confirm that QT is the culprit.) –  j_random_hacker Nov 29 '10 at 7:58
    
what is exactly Qt-dependet here? –  user657461 Mar 13 '11 at 12:13
    
@GSs Result varies between the QT compiled exe, and VS compiled exe(I already mentioned this in the question) –  prabhakaran Mar 14 '11 at 3:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your problem is that the result of your floating-point operation is 9999.9999999... so int(...) is int(9999.9999999...) which, of course, is 9999. Since floating point operations are rarely exact, you must not write your code to expect them to be. In this case, you could use a rounding function.

As was pointed out in the comment, it's extremely unlikely that your implementation of pow(10,4) doesn't yield a positive integer, so your example is probably flawed. However, the point still stands: don't ever expect floating point results to be exact.

See also: why is 1.2 * 30 = 35?

share|improve this answer
    
Basically right but no +1 (yet) because pow(10,4) = 9999.99999999999 isn't necessarily so. On my system it is 10000 exactly. –  j_random_hacker Nov 29 '10 at 6:55
    
he doesn't claim that it's always the case? But that it can be, and apparently is for prabhakaran. –  Frank Osterfeld Nov 29 '10 at 7:44
    
@Frank Osterfeld: He did claim that in an earlier version, FTR. –  j_random_hacker Nov 29 '10 at 16:13

Remember pow(10,4) and pow(10.0,4) and pow(10.0,4.0) don't call the same function.

share|improve this answer

There is no standard that guarantees the accuracy of the pow function. Responsible library vendors try to get simple exact cases like this right, but you cannot depend on this (as your experience shows) if you want to write good portable code.

If you require small integer powers computed exactly, compute them with repeated multiplication (or with a library function intended for that purpose), not with a call to pow.

share|improve this answer

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