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In a bit of code I'm looking at, a 3D array has been initialized like so:

static const char codeset[6][256][10] = {
    [0] = { [0x20] = " ",
    [0x21] = "!",
    [0x22] = """,
    [0x23] = "#",
}};

(It does go on to initialize the rest of the cells, I've cut it short to show something readable.)

This does not compile. Is it supposed to? What's going on here?

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Could we have the error message ? –  Antoine Pelisse Nov 29 '10 at 10:44
    
syntax error : '[', pointing to the line with [0]. –  dkb Nov 29 '10 at 10:48
1  
Compiles for me correctly (gcc 4.5.1). If you're on GCC, you can add -std=c99 to your command line just to be on the safe side, as it's a C99 extension. –  Kos Nov 29 '10 at 11:51
    
Alas, I'm in Visual studio, and apparently it's not going to work there: eggheadcafe.com/software/aspnet/34012666/… –  dkb Nov 29 '10 at 12:05
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are trying to use C99 initializers, but most likely your compiler isn't C99-compliant, otherwise it would work.

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2  
Good link, but unless my reading skills are bugged, it states that it's C99 extension, not GCC extension. GCC extends upon this by allowing to initialize ranges. +1 anyway as the link explains what's going on here. I didn't know that one too :) –  Kos Nov 29 '10 at 11:50
    
@Kos Thanks, corrected. I was so much sure it is GCC-only so I didn't read thoughtfully. –  qrdl Nov 29 '10 at 14:34
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You are using C99 initializers, but your compiler does not support C99 or C99 is not enabled.

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As a guess, it trying to create the "alphabet" for xml string ASCII data. The " (double quote) character in xml is represented as &quot. So the [0][0 - 255] group is xml.

It looks like an equivalence table. It translates from xml to ASCII or whatever.

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Heh, maybe I was unclear - I know what the point of the array is, I want to know what's the problem with the initialization (Which, from what I've read, isn't actually supposed to work like that). –  dkb Nov 29 '10 at 10:50
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