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This is the problematic query (with the intended meaning: pull all entities paired with entity 530 into a new table, with the count of the pairs):

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE paired (
  entity_id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
  numrels INTEGER
)
SELECT I.entity2_id, COUNT(I.relation_id) AS numrels
FROM pairs I
WHERE I.entity1_id = 530 AND I.entity2_id IS NOT NULL
GROUP BY I.entity2_id
;

I interpret the error message:

ERROR 1062 (23000): Duplicate entry '0' for key 1

as the complaint that I am violating primary key's uniqueness. However, I am grouping by that value, which should ensure the uniqueness, right? Then I thought to try this:

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE paired (
  entity_id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
  numrels INTEGER
)
;
INSERT INTO paired
SELECT I.entity2_id, COUNT(I.relation_id) AS numrels
FROM pairs I
WHERE I.entity1_id = 530 AND I.entity2_id IS NOT NULL
GROUP BY I.entity2_id
;

Surprisingly enough, this works without any problems, even though, according to my understanding, the two should be equivalent.

What gives?!?

For reference:

mysql  Ver 14.12 Distrib 5.0.82sp1, for redhat-linux-gnu (x86_64) using readline 5.1
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Are the id values that you get unique? Can you post some example data? –  Sebastian Hoitz Nov 29 '10 at 13:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your statements are not equivalent. CREATE ... SELECT creates the columns you mention in the CREATE part of the statement (that is, entity_id and numrels), and in addition creates columns for each column of the SELECT part of the statement. You end up with four columns in your new table. The results of SELECT are inserted into the last two columns. The other columns are filled with their default values, which results in violating the uniqueness of your primary key.

See also http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/create-table-select.html

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1  
Thank you! Not quite correct, but correct enough that I understood what was happening. More precisely: I have another similar query, and that one works. The reason is, the query before had entity_id in both SELECT and CREATE; in this one, I have entity2_id. If the column names are the same, they are conflated. Thus, I had two columns in that one, but three in this one (entity_id, numrels, entity2_id). :D –  Amadan Nov 29 '10 at 17:06

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