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if I have this SQL query:

select substring(id for 2) as key, 
yw, count(*)
from pref_money group by yw, key

returning number of users per week and per key:

 key |   yw    | count
-----+---------+-------
 VK  | 2010-45 |   144
 VK  | 2010-44 |    79
 MR  | 2010-46 |    72
 OK  | 2010-48 |   415
 FB  | 2010-45 |    11
 FB  | 2010-44 |     8
 MR  | 2010-47 |    55
 VK  | 2010-47 |   136
 DE  | 2010-48 |    35
 VK  | 2010-46 |   124
 MR  | 2010-44 |    40
 MR  | 2010-45 |    58
 FB  | 2010-47 |    13
 FB  | 2010-46 |    13
 OK  | 2010-47 |  1834
 MR  | 2010-48 |    13
 OK  | 2010-46 |  1787
 DE  | 2010-44 |    83
 DE  | 2010-45 |   128
 FB  | 2010-48 |     4
 OK  | 2010-44 |  1099
 OK  | 2010-45 |  1684
 DE  | 2010-46 |   118
 VK  | 2010-48 |    29
 DE  | 2010-47 |   148

Then how can I please count those users? I'm trying:

    $sth = $db->prepare('select substring(id for 2) as key, yw, count(*)
                         from pref_money group by yw, key');
    $sth->execute();
    while ($row = $sth->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC))
            ++$users[$row['yw']][$row['key']];
    print_r($users);

but get numerous errors.

I'm trying to get the data for a stacked bars diagram. The x-axis will show the week numbers and the y-axis will show number of users, grouped by the key strings.

Thank you! Alex

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Are you trying to total the count column or just get number of rows returned? If the latter, php has a method for that. if the former, you need to make it $users[$row['yw']][$row['key'] += $row['count'] instead (assuming the array has already been created).

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Good point about the number of rows, this was wrong in my code. But how do you "create" the array please? I'm coming from Perl and there the array would be created automatically... (so-called autovivification) –  Alexander Farber Nov 29 '10 at 14:52
    
Actually with $users[$row['yw']][$row['key']] = $row['count']; my code works ok now, so those have been just warnings. Thank you for the answer. I still wonder how to silence the warnings for ++$arr['a']['b'] though... –  Alexander Farber Nov 29 '10 at 14:57
    
PHP needs things declared before use. (Basically you're trying to increase a null value, thus the warning). To eliminate this, you're ebst bet is probably using $users = Array() then checking if (!is_set($users[$row['yw']]) $users[$row['yw']] = Array(); then also if (!is_set($users[$row['yw']][$row['key']])) $users[$row['yw']][$row['key']] = 0; Then you can begin any arithmetic. –  Brad Christie Nov 29 '10 at 15:51
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$sth = $db->prepare('select substring(id for 2) as key, yw, count(*)
                         from pref_money group by yw, key');
    $sth->execute();
    $users=array();  //  register $users as an array.
    while ($row = $sth->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC))
            if(!isset($users[$row['yw']])){// see if $users['whatever_key'] has already been set
               $users[$row['yw']]=0;//if not, initialize it as a default starting value of 0
             }
            $users[$row['yw']]+=$row['key'];//now we won't get any nasty notices here about undeclared variables or keys..
    print_r($users);
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-1 - suppressing the error is not a solution –  Adam Hopkinson Nov 29 '10 at 14:30
    
the problem wasn't with the error on the uninitialized variable, I don't see the rest of his code and for all I know, he properly registers them, the problem was he did " ++$users[$row['yw']][$row['key']];" which was not exactly going to sum those values.... I forced the suppression out of habit when working in code blocks someone else wrote when I don't know if they properly initialized or not. –  FatherStorm Nov 29 '10 at 14:36
    
What do you mean by "properly registering variables" please? I'd be glad to declare my variables in PHP before using them and to get errors otherwise (like "use strict" in Perl), but I haven't found how to do it in PHP yet. –  Alexander Farber Nov 29 '10 at 14:40
    
suggesting the error suppression character teaches bad habits - at the least you should have suggested your reason for the problem and how to fix it. Plus, autovivification refers to treating variables as dynamic structures - ie not needing to register a key before using it. –  Adam Hopkinson Nov 29 '10 at 15:06
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