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Usually code looks like this:

(one-thing
    (another-thing arg1 (f arg5 r))
    (another-thing arg1 (f arg5 r)))

Why doesn't it like this?:

(one-thing
    (another-thing arg1 (f arg5 r))
    (another-thing arg1 (f arg5 r))
)

It allows adding and removing "another-thing" lines more easily (without removing and re-adding trailing closing parenthesis). Also you can put a some comment on that lone closing parenthesis (such as "; end of the loop").

How bad is it when I mix by code that uses the second style with existing code that uses the first style?

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4  
i, for one, would very much preffer the second style. after reading books and articles about writing clean code, going the extra mile to know "where" some stuff ends (not that it just ends), is ok –  Belun Nov 29 '10 at 16:46
    
I used to put a blank between closing parentheses for opening parentheses on the same line and for those on previous lines. No, at the time my editor didn't highlight matching parentheses. –  starblue Dec 1 '10 at 7:49
    
possible duplicate of Lisp Parentheses –  Mechanical snail Aug 7 '12 at 11:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 24 down vote accepted

There are two points to be made here:

  1. Conventions are important in themselves. Sticking to wrapped parens means your code is more readable by other lisp programmers, and if you adopt this style you will also develop practice at reading theirs

  2. The advantages of splitting )s onto their own lines are not actually advantages in the eyes of most lispers. If you are using a half-decent editor it will have commands that understand balanced expressions, for moving across them, cutting, pasting, transposing, etc. So you don't need

    )  ; end of the loop
    

    in lisp any more than you need

    # end of the loop
    

    in some whitespace-sensitive language like Python

See e.g. http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/manual/html_node/emacs/Expressions.html

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What for ones that haven't yet coped with Emacs and using line-based editors? –  Vi. Nov 29 '10 at 15:11
8  
They tend not to be Lisp programmers. But there aren't many "ed" and "edlin" users left still, are there? Vi(m) users, take a look at stackoverflow.com/questions/94792/… –  telent Nov 29 '10 at 15:20
    
FYI: that is the python comment char –  Paul Nathan Nov 29 '10 at 17:26
1  
I can't say I agree with reason #1, or that it's listed first. It makes it sound like Lisp programmers use this style primarily because all the other Lisp programmers do. :-) #2 is in fact the real reason: it saves a ton of space, and the (very) few things that are harder with "))" on the same line, we solved by adding that feature to our editor (in part because Lisp is so easy for it to parse). –  Ken Nov 30 '10 at 1:47
    
The two points are listed alphabetically, and not in order of importance ;-) Yes, I should have said that in the absence of any good reasons for stranding the trailing parens, the saving on vertical whitespace is compelling –  telent Nov 30 '10 at 10:03

In Lisp and other languages that use S-expressions for syntax, the parentheses are primarily for the benefit of the compiler, while layout and indentation (which are ignored by the compiler) are for the benefit of programmers.

So there is no need to put closing parentheses on their own lines: well-chosen line breaks and indentation will be sufficient to make the structure clear.

For example,

(defun clone-indirect-buffer-other-window (newname display-flag &optional norecord)
  "Like `clone-indirect-buffer' but display in another window."
  (interactive
   (progn
     (if (get major-mode 'no-clone-indirect)
         (error "Cannot indirectly clone a buffer in %s mode" mode-name))
     (list (if current-prefix-arg
               (read-buffer "Name of indirect buffer: " (current-buffer)))
           t)))
  (let ((pop-up-windows t))
    (clone-indirect-buffer newname display-flag norecord)))

The structure is clear (to a moderately experienced Lisp programmer) from the indentation. Nothing would be added by bringing some of the closing parentheses down onto new lines:

(defun clone-indirect-buffer-other-window (newname display-flag &optional norecord)
  "Like `clone-indirect-buffer' but display in another window."
  (interactive
   (progn
     (if (get major-mode 'no-clone-indirect)
         (error "Cannot indirectly clone a buffer in %s mode" mode-name)
       )
     (list (if current-prefix-arg
               (read-buffer "Name of indirect buffer: " (current-buffer))
             )
           t)
     )
   )
  (let ((pop-up-windows t))
    (clone-indirect-buffer newname display-flag norecord)
    )
  )

I should add that nearly all Lisp programmers use an editor that displays matching parentheses, performs automatic indentation, and provides a user interface for working direcly with balanced expressions. In Emacs, for example, there's M-( for inserting a new expression, M-) for moving past the end of the current expression, C-M-k for deleting the expression after point, and so on.

So Lisp programmers never have to count parentheses by hand in order to figure out which ones match.


Taylor R. Campbell eloquently expresses this rationale:

The actual bracket characters are simply lexical tokens to which little significance should be assigned. Lisp programmers do not examine the brackets individually, or, Azathoth forbid, count brackets; instead they view the higher-level structures expressed in the program, especially as presented by the indentation. Lisp is not about writing a sequence of serial instructions; it is about building complex structures by summing parts. The composition of complex structures from parts is the focus of Lisp programs, and it should be readily apparent from the Lisp code. Placing brackets haphazardly about the presentation is jarring to a Lisp programmer, who otherwise would not even have seen them for the most part.

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5  
+1 for actually answering the question. –  Sasha Chedygov Nov 30 '10 at 1:52
2  
Indeed, one good reason people avoid putting parens on their own lines is that it makes them easier to count, and counting parens is something a human should never do. –  technomancy Nov 30 '10 at 17:53
1  
"and provides a user interface for working direcly with balanced expressions" - this part is not [yet] configured in my Vim, and this is the primary reason why I think of putting some closing brackets on separate lines. –  Vi. Dec 1 '10 at 10:57
    
If you're using vim, you can do a ":set showmatch", and then when you put your cursor on a paren, it will show you the matching paren. –  coder_tim Dec 6 '10 at 20:32

Short answer: Deviating from recognized standards only serves to alienate potential contributors. No one style is optimally better than another.

Long answer: http://blog.fogus.me/2010/08/30/community-standards/

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4  
I don't think this answers the question. It may be true that it's advantageous to stick to customs, but that doesn't say why anybody ever picked this particular custom to begin with. Once upon a time, somebody had to first write in this style, and (through consensus, authority, or other reason) cause it to become the "recognized standard". –  Ken Nov 30 '10 at 1:50

Do what you like! It's your code.

That said, you'll probably eventually move them all back so that you can get more stuff on the screen at once. It really is true that you effectively stop seeing the brackets after a while.

Actually, it's a bit worse than that. These days when I try to use beloved python, it feels like my code isn't securely tied together without its brackets and I worry that it might fall apart at any moment.

Hell, record a couple of keyboard macros to swap the whole file from one style to the other. (And learn how to make your version control ignore whitespace-only changes. :-)

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If you're using Emacs, you need to learn these. In particular, C-M-k makes killing a balanced expression just as easy as killing a line. Couple that with good highlighting of balanced parentheses, and there's really no need to write things this way.

On the other hand, having all those )s on lines by themselves means that you see less of your code on the screen at once, making it harder to read and refactor.

If you're not using Emacs, you should at least be using an editor that supports those basic operations, or coding in lisp is going to be a pain.

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Currently I usually use balanced approach: putting some closing parentheses on the same line, some on the next line indented, sone on the third line, depending on context. When considering how much closing parentheses should be on which line, I usually think about 1. Whould duplicate/remove line be meaningful? 2. Will RCS diffs and patches look well? Also I tend to leave many line-busting single ')' when actively developing a piece of code, then "refactor" it to the scheme above after it stabilized a bit. –  Vi. Mar 19 '13 at 18:46
    
I didn't consider the effects on revision control diffs. Having just lines change by a parenthesis is a little annoying. I know that git can ignore space changes. I wonder if it can be configured to ignore single parenthesis changes. –  asmeurer Mar 19 '13 at 22:37

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